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APPENDIX:
AGGREGATED RESPONSES TO THE QUESTIONAIRE


PART I
SCOPE OF WORK-BASED LEARNING


This section of the questionnaire focuses on identifying the scope of work-based learning (WBL) programs being offered in your institution during the 1993 fiscal year (FY93), which represents the time period of July 1, 1992, to June 30, 1993.

By work-based learning (WBL) programs, we mean instructional programs that deliberately use the workplace as a site for student learning. WBL programs are formal, structured, and strategically organized by instructional staff, employers, or sometimes other groups to link learning in the workplace to students' college-based learning experiences. WBL programs have formal instructional plans that directly relate students' WBL activities to their career goals. These WBL experiences are usually but not always college-credit generating. Instructional programs that involve youth apprenticeships, clinical experiences, school-based enterprises, and formal registered apprenticeships are examples of the kind of WBL programs we are seeking to learn about in this study.

Q-1. What was your institution's total head count enrollment for fiscal year 1993 (FY93)? (n=430)
12,402 (mean) Total Head Count
Q-2. The table below lists major curriculum areas offered by many two-year colleges.

Column 1





Major Curriculum Area
Column 2

Estimated

Curriculum
Area
Head Count
Enrollment for
FY93
Column 3

Estimated

Number of
Students in
WBL Programs
in Curriculum
Area for FY93
Occupational-technical curriculum areas (e.g., health, business & office, technologies, agriculture, vocational programs) (n=419/358) 4,835 819
Transfer curriculum areas (e.g., liberal arts & sciences, mathematics, fine & applied arts, humanities) (n=370/87) 6,004 486
Developmental/basic studies (e.g., remedial courses, learning skills, human development) (n=334/32) 2,209 470
Community and continuing education (e.g., adult education, lifelong learning, extension programs) (n=383/63) 6,845 1,397
Customized or contract training in technical, academic, or managerial areas for local business & industry (n=267/117) 2,074 943
Other (please specify) (n=51/6) 2,365 629

Q-3. In the table below is a list of occupational program and academic areas that are sometimes offered by two-year colleges. For each of the programs listed below, place a check in the box if WBL activities are required for students majoring in that area. If enrollment figures are available for the program for FY93, please provide them in the designated space.

N Program Area Enroll-
ment
in
FY93
(Mean)
N Program Area Enroll-
ment
in
FY93
(Mean)
50 Accounting 17013 Interior design 84
24 Agribusiness & management 7759 Law enforcement 247
12 Architectural design & technology 728 Life sciences 434
64 Automotivemechanics 9750 Marketing 82
9 Aviation & space technology 11711 Mechanical design technology 93
13 Banking & finance 8414 Media & graphic arts 88
53 Business administration & management 34614 Metalworking 58
10 Biotechnology 4616 Microcomputers 148
9 Brick, block, & stonemasonry 4610 Natural resources & environmental sciences 83
25 Carpentry 58262 Nursing & nursing-related occupations
344
107 Child care & development 13529 Occupational therapy 112
11 Communications 35356 Office management 156
21 Computer-aided design & drafting 725 Personnel management 54
7 Computer integrated manufacturing 3412 Photography 82
35 Computer technology 25939 Physical therapy 90
23 Construction 9516 Plumbing 94
17 Corrections 12810 Printing 94
47 Dental hygiene 621 Public utilities management 5
31 Education 828 Quality, control, management & improvement
95
40 Electronics & electronics technology 11081 Radiologic technology 80
76 Emergency medical technology 12215 Real estate 54
30 Fashion merchandising 5077 Respiratory therapy 80
23 Firefighting 18118 Retailing 57
34 Food production 11552 Social work/social services 169
7 Forestry 432 Statistical process control 22
19 Heating, air conditioning, & refrigerator 537 Telecommunications technology 48
15 Humanities 5509 Tool & die making 117
19 Horticulture 7928 Welding, brazing, & soldering 50
43 Hotel/motel management 74114 Other: 188
25 Information processing 241



PART II
HEALTH WORK-BASED LEARNING PROGRAM


Work-based learning (WBL) often takes place in the health-related curriculum (e.g., nursing, radiology, medical lab, dental) of two-year colleges. This section presents a series of questions that will provide an in-depth look at one of your college's health-related WBL programs. Considering all your college's health programs that require WBL, which one best meets the following criteria? (This is not necessarily your largest program.)

Formal Structure The program has formal instructional plans that deliberately link workplace learning to students' college-based learning experiences.
Fully Operational Your college faculty, local employers, and other supporting organizations are formally committed to carrying out these WBL experiences for students.
Proven Track Record The program has successfully prepared students to reach their intended career and academic goals; evaluation data exists to support claims of program effectiveness.
Innovative Approaches The program utilizes new and creative strategies in curriculum and instruction; program administration; and partnerships between education, business, labor, and other organizations.

If no health WBL program meets these criteria, please skip to Part III.

Q-4. Write the name of the health WBL program you selected in the blank below.

______________See text_________________ HEALTH WBL PROGRAM

Q-5. Please describe the qualities of this program that led you to select it as the best WBL program offered in your college's health curriculum.

______________See text_________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________

Q-6. In what year was this health WBL program first implemented? (n=377)
_______Prior to 1960_______ _______4.6%______
_______1961 to 1969_______ _______25.8%_____
_______1970 to 1979_______ _______31.1%_____
_______1980 to 1989_______ _______16.3%_____
_______1990 to Present_____ _______5.3%_______
Q-7. How many students were enrolled in this WBL program in FY93? (n=395)

153 (mean) Enrollment In FY93

Q-8. At completion of this health WBL program, approximately how many hours (on average) would a student have spent in the workplace? (n=351)

800 (mean) Hours In Workplace

Q-9. Approximately how many full-time and part-time faculty were directly involved with this health WBL program during FY93?

7 (mean) Full-Time Faculty In FY93 (n=391)

8 (mean) Part-Time Faculty In FY93 (n=369)

Q-10. What percentage of the health-care providers/employers that participated in this health WBL program during FY93 were small, medium-sized, or large? (Please provide your best estimate.)

Health-Care Provider/Employer Size Percentage
Small companies (fewer than 100 employees) (n=378) 27.6% (mean)
Medium-sized companies (100-500 employees) (n=388) 43.8% (mean)
Large companies (over 500 employees) (n=383) 29.2% (mean)

Q-11. Was this health WBL program formally part of a Tech Prep grant funded with federal vocational education funds during FY93? (n=386)
8.5% YES
90.7% NO
Q-12. Which one of the following general models best represents your selected health WBL program? (n=393)
97.2% Clinical experiences - worksite learning occurring in association with preparation for a credential in a professional field such as healthcare, law, or education
1.8% Cooperative education - a combination of vocational coursework and work experience where students earn credit working in jobs secured through written cooperative agreements
0.0% School-based enterprise - small businesses created and operated by students where the college implements a real, economically viable business venture
0.0% Traditional formal apprenticeship - registered with the Bureau of Apprenticeship Training
0.0% Youth Apprenticeship - an articulated curriculum linking secondary and postsecondary education that incorporates employer-paid work experience and guided worksite learning. Completers receive recognized credentials of occupational and academic skill mastery.
1.0% Other
Q-13. Which of the following components were a formal part of your selected health WBL program during FY93?

Formal Part of Program
Component of WBL Program Yes No NA
1. Coordinated classroom & workplace learning (n=399)99.5% 0.3% 0.3%
2. Integrated occupational-technical & academic instruction (n=399)91.7% 6.0% 2.3%
3. Entrepreneurship or small business training for students (n=399) 2.5%60.7%36.8%
4. Individualized student training plans (n=399)49.6%36.8%13.5%
5. Rotation of students through different jobs (n=398)83.2%11.6% 5.3%
6. Wages or stipends for students participating in WBL (n=399) 4.3%79.4%16.3%
7. Periodic evaluation of student progress (n=399)99.7% 0.3% 0.0%
8. Formal program of career awareness, orientation, & guidance (n=399)86.5% 9.3% 4.3%
9. Formal assessment, certification of skills based on ind. standards (n=399)94.0% 4.0% 2.0%
10. Recognized credentials of academic occupational mastery for completers (n=398)88.4% 5.0%6.5%
11. Recruitment of targeted student groups (n=399)48.1%38.8%13.0%
12. Preparatory or remedial services to enable students to enter WBL (n=399)75.9%15.5% 8.5%
13. Transitional services for special needs populations/at-risk students (n=399)65.4%23.6%11.0%
14. Job placement for WBL graduates (n=399)56.4%35.1% 8.5%
15. Guaranteed hiring of qualified graduates by participating employers
(n=398)

11.8%

78.1%

10.1%
16. Formal articulation agreements with secondary school WBL programs
(n=399)

19.8%

67.7%

12.5%
17. Funded Tech Prep program (n=399)11.3%77.4%11.3%
18. Mentors or coaches for students in the workplace (n=399)65.7%28.6% 5.8%
19. Training and credentialling of workplace mentors or coaches (n=399)41.6%46.9%11.5%
20. Regular consultation between workplace mentors & college faculty
(n=399)

75.2%

16.0%
8.8%
21. Inservice of college faculty & staff in WBL concepts (n=398)45.0%43.7%11.3%
22. Training of college faculty & staff conducted by business (n=399)30.1%55.1%14.8%
23. Training of college faculty & staff in the workplace (n=398)52.0%34.7%13.3%
24. Incentives to increase WBL participation by businesses, trade organizations, unions, & community-based organizations
(n=398)

15.1%

63.3%

21.6%
25. Workplace (employer-based) training centers used for WBL (n=399)40.9%42.9%16.3%
26. Formal contracts or co-op agreements w/institutional partners (n=399)94.7% 3.5% 1.8%
27. Donations of funding & equipment by businesses (n=399)58.4%32.8% 8.8%
28. Governing/advisory board composed of institutional partners (n=399)85.7%11.3% 3.0%
29. Marketing and/or promotion of WBL programs (n=398)57.3%28.9%13.8%

Q-14. This question focuses on identifying the location of primary responsibility for many of the components of WBL programs identified in the previous question. Use the following codes for the organization:
Collegehas primary responsibility for the component. Workplace (e.g., employers, labor) has primary responsibility for the component.
Some other agency (e.g., community-based agency) has primary responsibility for the component.
Formal/shared contract or agreement between the college and any other (e.g., employers,
labor, community-based organizations) defines joint responsibility for the component.
The component does not apply (NA) to your WBL program.

Component College Work-
Place
Other
Agency
Formal/
Shared
NA
1. Delivery of instruction is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)94.2% 0.5% 0.0% 5.0% 0.3%
2. Curriculum development is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)93.0% 0.0% 0.8%6.0% 0.3%
3. Student selection is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)94.0% 0.8% 0.0% 4.3% 1.0%
4. WBL experiences take place primarily at (n=398) 4.0%74.6% 4.0%15.6% 1.8%
5. Supervision of students is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)72.9% 5.3% 0.0%21.1% 0.8%
6. Evaluation of students is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)72.7% 2.3% 0.0%24.6% 0.5%
7. Organizing help for students having difficulty in WBL is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)87.0% 1.0% 0.0%10.8% 1.3%
8. Student wage rates are primarily determined by (n=399) 0.3% 8.8% 1.0% 0.8% 89.2%
9. Assessment & certification of student skill mastery at program completion are primarily the responsibility of (n=398)76.6% 0.5% 7.0%14.8% 1.0%
10. Awarding of recognized credentials of mastery is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)68.9% 0.3%22.1% 3.0% 5.8%
11. Selection & assignment of workplace mentors or coaches are primarily the responsibility of (n=398)41.2%13.6% 0.0%22.6%22.6%
12. Training & credentialling of mentors or coaches are primarily the responsibility of (n=398)38.9%13.3% 2.3%14.1%31.4%
13. Final negotiation of contractual agreements among institutional partners is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)50.9% 0.0% 0.0%46.1% 3.0%
14. Instructor/student ratios are primarily determined by (n=399)53.6% 4.0%26.8%14.0% 1.5%
15. Length of training & related instruction are primarily determined by (n=399)68.9% 0.0%18.8% 9.5% 2.8%
16. Placement of students in permanent full-time jobs is primarily the responsibility of (n=398)31.2%12.1% 3.3% 7.5%46.0%
17. Transporting students is primarily the responsibility of (n=398) 7.8% 0.3% 0.5% 1.0% 90.5%
18. Student work permits are primarily the responsibility of (n=398) 8.5% 1.3% 4.3% 1.0%84.9%
19. Student insurance or liability is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)75.9% 1.8%1.0% 4.8%16.5%
20. Compliance with state or federal child labor laws is primarily the responsibility of (n=399)29.3% 5.3% 1.3%11.3%52.9%
21. Compliance with state & federal laws governing health
& safety is primarily the responsibility of
(n=399)33.8% 8.0% 0.8%54.1% 3.3%



PART III
OTHER WORK-BASED LEARNING PROGRAM


Besides the health curriculum, other areas of two-year college curriculum sometimes offer WBL programs. This section presents a series of questions that will provide an in-depth look at one of your college's WBL programs in a curriculum area other than health. What one WBL program outside of health best meets the following criteria? (Again, this is not necessarily your largest program.)

Formal Structure The program has formal instructional plans that deliberately link workplace learning to students' college-based learning experiences.
Fully Operational Your college faculty, local employers, and other supporting organizations are formally involved in carrying out these WBL experiences for students.
Proven Track Record The program has successfully prepared students to reach their intended career and academic goals; evaluation data exists to support claims of program effectiveness.
Innovative Approaches The program utilizes new and creative strategies in curriculum and instruction; program administration; and partnerships between education, business, labor, and other organizations.

If no other WBL program meets these criteria, please skip to Part IV.

Q-15. Write the name of the nonhealth WBL program you selected in the blank below.

______________See text_____________ Nonhealth WBL Program

Please answer questions 16-25 for this other WBL program.

Q-16. Please describe the qualities of this program that led you to select it as the best WBL program offered by your college in a curriculum area other than health. Please attach copies of any written materials (e.g., contracts, training agreements, evaluations) that describe how this WBL program operates.

______________See text________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________

Q-17. In what year was this other WBL program first implemented? (n=312)
_______Prior to 1960_______ _______5.1%_____
_______1961 to 1969_______ _______6.4%_____
_______1970 to 1979_______ _______21.4%____
_______1980 to 1989_______ _______23.8%____
_______1990 to Present_____ _______12.1%____
Q-18. How many students were enrolled in this WBL program in FY93? (n=319)

159 (mean) Enrollment in FY93

Q-19. At completion of this other WBL program, approximately how many hours (on average) would a student have spent in the workplace? (n=260)

770 (mean) Hours in Workplace

Q-20. Approximately how many full-time and part-time faculty were directly involved with this other WBL program during FY93?

3 (mean) Full-Time Faculty in FY93 (n=309)

4 (mean) Part-Time Faculty in FY93 (n=274)

Q-21. What percentage of the employers were small, medium-sized, and large companies that participated in this selected other WBL program during FY93?

Employer Company Size Percentage (mean)
Small companies (fewer than 100 employees) (n=314) 63.4%
Medium-sized companies (100-500 employees) (n=309) 19.0%
Large companies (over 500 employees) (n=304) 14.7%

Q-22. Was this other WBL program formally part of a Tech Prep grant funded with federal vocational education funds during FY93? (n=315)
9.2% Yes
88.9% No
Q-23. Which one of the following general models best represents your selected other WBL program? (n=316)
13.0% Clinical experiences - worksite learning occurring in association with preparation for a credential in a professional field such as healthcare, law, or education
63.6% Cooperative education - a combination of vocational coursework and work experience where students earn credit working in jobs secured through written cooperative agreements
2.2% School-based enterprise - small businesses created and operated by students where the college implements a real, economically viable business venture
6.6% Traditional formal apprenticeship registered with the Bureau of Apprenticeship Training
1.9% Youth Apprenticeship - an articulated curriculum linking secondary and postsecondary education that incorporates employer-paid work experience and guided worksite learning. Completers receive recognized credentials of occupational and academic skill mastery.
12.7% Other
Q-24. Which of the following components were a formal part of your selected nonhealth WBL program during FY93?

Formal Part of Progam?
Component of WBL Progam Yes No NA
1. Coordinated classroom & workplace learning (n=322) 94.4% 3.4% 2.2%
2. Integrated occupational-technical & academic instruction (n=322) 85.4% 9.6% 5.0%
3. Entrepreneurship or small business training for students (n=322) 33.5% 46.6% 19.9%
4. Individualized student training plans (n=322) 73.3% 21.1% 5.6%
5. Rotation of students through different jobs (n=322) 56.2% 34.2% 9.6%
6. Wages or stipends for students participating in WBL (n=322) 61.8% 27.3% 10.9%
7. Periodic evaluation of student progress (n=322) 99.1% 0.0% 0.9%
8. Formal program of career awareness, orientation, & guidance (n=322)79.2%14.0% 6.8%
9. Formal assessment & certification of skills based on industry standards (n=322)68.9%22.7% 8.4%
10. Recognized credentials of occupational & academic mastery for completers (n=321)69.8%20.6% 9.7%
11. Recruitment of targeted student groups (n=322)59.3%30.1%10.6%
12. Preparatory or remedial services to enable students to enter WBL (n=322)74.5%18.0% 7.5%
13. Transitional services for special needs populations/at-risk students (n=321)57.6%29.0%13.4%
14. Job placement for WBL graduates (n=322)68.9%20.5%10.6%
15. Guaranteed hiring of qualified graduates by participating employers (n=321)13.4%73.5%13.1%
16. Formal articulation agreements with sec. WBL programs (n=322)27.3%55.9%16.8%
17. Funded Tech Prep program (n=322)15.2%72.0%12.7%
18. Mentors or coaches for students in the workplace (n=322)71.1%23.9% 5.0%
19. Training & credentialling of workplace mentors or coaches (n=322)26.7%59.9%13.4%
20. Regular consultation between workplace mentors & college faculty (n=322)77.6%16.8% 5.6%
21. Inservice of college faculty & staff in WBL concepts (n=322)39.1%53.7% 7.1%
22. Training of college faculty & staff conducted by business (n=322)31.4%59.9% 8.7%
23. Training of college faculty & staff in the workplace (n=321)36.4%55.8% 7.8%
24. Incentives to increase WBL participation by businesses, trade organizations, unions, community-based organizations, or others (n=322)28.0%55.8%16.2%
25. Workplace (employer-based) training centers used for WBL (n=322)37.9%50.9%11.2%
26. Formal contracts or cooperative agreements with institutional partners (n=321)69.8%25.5% 4.7%
27. Donations of funding & equipment by businesses (n=321)53.6%39.9% 6.5%
28. Formal governing/advisory board composed of institutional partners (n=320) 81.9% 15.0% 3.1%
29. Marketing and/or promotion of WBL programs (n=321) 71.7% 21.5% 6.9%

Q-25. This question focuses on identifying the location of primary responsibility for many of the components of WBL programs identified in the previous question (Q-24). For each component listed below, indicate which type of organization has primary responsibility for your selected WBL program. Use the following codes for the organization:
Collegehas primary responsibility for the component.
Workplace (e.g., employers, labor) has primary responsibility for the component.
Some other agency (e.g., community-based agency) has primary responsibility for the component.
Formal/shared contract or agreement between the college and any other organizations (e.g., employers, labor, community-based organizations) defines joint responsibility for the component.
The component does not apply (NA) to your WBL program.

Component College Work-
Place
Other
Agency
Formal/
Shared
NA
1. Delivery of instruction is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)82.9% 3.1% 0.3%12.8% 0.9%
2. Curriculum development is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)80.1% 2.2% 0.6%15.9% 1.2%
3. Student selection is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)60.7%14.3% 1.9%19.9% 3.1%
4. WBL experiences take place primarily at (n=322) 3.1% 81.7% 1.2% 12.7% 1.2%
5. Supervision of students is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)25.8%25.5% 1.6%45.7% 1.6%
6. Evaluation of students is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)33.0%10.6% 0.3%54.5% 1.6%
7. Organizing help for students with difficulty in WBL is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)70.5%3.1% 1.6%22.4% 2.5%
8. Determination of student wage rates is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)0.9%61.5% 3.4% 5.0% 29.2%
9. Assessment & certification of student skill mastery at program completion are primarily the responsibility of (n=322)51.9% 7.8% 3.1%29.8%7.5%
10. Awarding of recognized credentials of mastery is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)64.0% 3.1% 6.5%11.2%15.2%
11. Selection & assignment of workplace mentors or coaches are primarily the responsibility of (n=322)25.5%36.0% 2.2%18.6%17.7%
l2 Training & credentialling of mentors or coaches are primarily the responsibility of (n=322)23.0%25.2% 4.0%10.2%37.6%
13. Final negotiation of contractual agreements among institutional partners is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)41.0% 0.9% 1.2% 36.6%20.2%
14. Instructor/student ratios is primarily determined by (n=322)76.7% 5.0% 3.1%10.2% 5.0%
15. Length of training & related instruction primarily determined by (n=322)74.5% 1.9% 6.2%16.5% 0.9%
16. Placement of students in permanent full-time jobs is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)36.0%14.3% 4.7%13.0%32.0%
17. Transporting students is primarily the responsibility of (n=321) 3.4% 1.9% 2.8% 1.9%90.0%
18. Student work permits are primarily the responsibility of (n=322) 7.5% 6.2% 2.2% 1.2%82.9%
19. Student insurance or liability is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)29.6%24.6% 2.5% 9.0% 34.3%
20. Compliance with state or federal child labor laws is primarily the responsibility of (n=322)15.5%25.2% 2.8%10.2%46.3%
21. Compliance with state & federal laws governing health and safety is primarily the responsibility of (n=321)17.1%43.6% 2.2%30.5% 6.5%



PART IV
SUPPORT FOR WORK-BASED LEARNING


Q-26. What barriers could slow the growth of WBL in your college? For each barrier listed below, indicate the level of impact it has on further development of WBL in your college.

Impact on Growth of WBL
Barrier None Very
Minor
Minor Moderate Major Very
Major
Lack of general awareness about WBL (n=447)12.5%11.2%25.7%34.9%12.8%2.9%
Lack of interest in WBL (n=447)11.9%13.9%27.1%30.4%13.6%3.1%
Lack of staff, time, & money dedicated to WBL (n=448) 7.5% 3.3%9.7%23.8%37.2%17.%
Battles between faculty groups concerning WBL (n=447)34.6%19.6%24.4%12.3% 5.5%2.0%
Lack of cooperation among institutional partners (n=447)23.5%23.5%27.1%14.1% 7.6%4.3%
Negative attitudes toward occupational (vocational) education (n=448)20.9%18.9%20.9%21.6%13.0% 3.3%
Lackof focus on integrated occupational & academic education (n=447)18.7%15.4%20.5%29.3%11.9%2.6%
Conflict with other curriculum reform movements (n=447)25.1%18.7%28.2%17.6%6.8%2.0%
Looking at WBL as another name for traditional occupational (vocational) programs (n=447)28.6%17.8%22.0%21.4%6.8%1.8%
Lack of knowledge & skills among faculty in WBL (n=448)20.7%16.1%21.8%24.2%13.9%2.0%
Lack of inservice available for personnel associated with WBL (n=448)17.0%15.0%21.4%26.4%15.9%3.1%
Too little time in curriculum for students to participate in WBL (n=448)15.2% 8.8%15.0%25.6%25.1%9.0%
Lack of formal public policy to support WBL (n=448)19.8%10.8%16.7%25.8%18.5%7.0%
Too little funding for WBL (n=448)10.1% 6.2% 9.5% 19.2%34.6%19.%
Lack of authority of local personnel to make changes needed to implement WBL (n=447)22.5%17.4%22.9%18.9%11.9%4.8%
Lack of interest from business and industry (n=448)16.1%15.0%23.4%24.1%13.4%8.0%
Lack of active involvement by business and industry (n=448)15.2%14.7%19.9%26.3%15.8%8.0%
Lack of cooperation by labor groups (n=447)29.5%21.0%20.6%14.5% 7.8% 6.5%
Lack of career orientation for students prior to their entering college (n=448)13.2%11.8%20.3%27.0%20.5%7.1%
Lack of focus on careers during college study (n=446)16.4%16.8%22.0%27.4%13.9%3.6%

Q-27. What level of support does this WBL program currently receive from the following groups?

Level of Support
Group Poor Fair Good Excellent NA
College faculty (n=447) 3.6% 15.2% 37.6% 36.5% 7.2%
College counselors (n=448) 4.0%17.4%35.9%33.0% 9.6%
College administrators (n=448) 1.6% 10.5%33.3%47.5% 7.1%
College trustees (n=448) 2.9% 8.8%30.4%33.0%23.6%
College students (n=448) 2.0%12.3%42.6%33.7% 9.4%
Local advisory committees/boards (n=448) 0.7% 8.1%31.1%49.8% 9.0%
Parents (n=446) 4.2%10.1%21.1%15.9%46.9%
Business/industry representatives (n=448) 1.8%12.1%39.6%36.8% 8.4%
Labor union representatives (n=448) 4.8%17.4%15.9% 7.9% 52.6%
Community-based organizations (n=447) 2.6%13.4%33.7%18.7%30.0%
State education agencies (n=448) 3.5%14.1%32.4%32.4%16.3%
State licensing agencies (n=448) 2.9% 7.5%26.7%31.9%29.7%
Four-year colleges or universities (n=448)20.7%19.2%15.6% 7.0%36.1%
Professional associations or organizations (n=446)3.3% 9.7%33.9%26.9%24.4%



PART V
INSTITUTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS


Q-28. What was your college's FTE enrollment for FY93? (n=417)

5,307 (mean) FTE Enrollment

Q-29. Over the past two fiscal years, the FTE enrollment at your college generally has (n=412)
56.8% Increased by more than 2% annually
37.1% Remained stable (i.e., the increase or decrease did not exceed 2%)
6.1% Decreased by more than 2% annually
Q-30. How many full-time faculty were employed by your college in FY93? (n=426)

136 (mean) Full-Time Faculty

Q-31. Approximately how many part-time faculty were employed by your college in the fall term of 1992? (n=425)

192 (mean) Part-Time Faculty in Fall 1992

Q-32 Two-year colleges provide three basic types of education: (1) transfer or college parallel; (2) occupational, technical, or career (including commercial and industrial training); and (3) adult, continuing, or basic education. In the table below, please estimate the percentage of students enrolled in each type of education your college offers.

Type of Education Percentage
Transfer or college parallel education (n=415) 36.7% (mean)
Occupational, technical, or career education (n=415) 41.3% (mean)
Adult, continuing, or basic education (n=411) 21.8% (mean)

Q-33. Over the past two years, financial resources to support your college have generally been (n=427)
19.7% Increasing
38.2% Stable
42.2% Decreasing
Q-34. How would you characterize your college community environment? (Circle the one best response.) (n=419)
51.6% Rural or small town
28.2% Suburban
20.3% Urban



PART VI
WBL POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS


A goal of this survey is to provide ideas for new government policies regarding WBL. To address this goal, we invite you to provide one or more recommendations for how local, state, and federal governments could encourage the growth of WBL programs in two-year colleges.

__________________________________See text___________________________________
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Use this space to write any other general comments about WBL.

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Please provide the following information so that, if necessary, we may follow up with you about information reported in this survey:

Name:________________________________________________________________________

Job Title:_____________________________________________________________________

Work Address:_______________________________________________________________
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Phone Number:_________________________ FAX Number:___________________________

Indicate the amount of time required to complete this survey: _____157 minutes (mean)______


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