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NCRVE MDS-746: Inclusion/Detracking: A Resource Guide

Inclusion/Detracking: A Resource Guide

MDS-746



Inclusion/Detracking: A Resource Guide

MDS-746


Compiled by

Office of Special Populations

Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein
Zipura Burac Matias
Esmeralda S. Cunanan
Becky Taylor Krall
Janet Kantenberger
Linda Iliff


University of Illinois



National Center for Research in Vocational Education
University of California at Berkeley
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94704-1058


Supported by
The Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education

December, 1995

PLEASE NOTE: This is an electronic version of a printed directory that was correct at the time of printing, but no effort has been made to keep all contact information up-to-date. For the most current information, visit the NCRVE Office of Student Services' website at http://ncrve-oss.ed.uiuc.edu/

FUNDING INFORMATION

Project Title: National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Grant Number: V051A30003-95A/V051A30004-95A
Act under which Funds Administered: Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act
P.L. 98-524
Source of Grant: Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education
Washington, DC 20202
Grantee: The Regents of the University of California
c/o National Center for Research in Vocational Education
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94704
Director: David Stern
Percent of Total Grant Financed by Federal Money: 100%
Dollar Amount of Federal Funds for Grant: $6,000,000
Disclaimer: This publication was prepared pursuant to a grant with the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education. Grantees undertaking such projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their judgement in professional and technical matters. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official U.S. Department of Education position or policy.
Discrimination: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Therefore, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education project, like every program or activity receiving financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education, must be operated in compliance with these laws.



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

There is a growing national sentiment to educate all students in programs which reflect the diversity of the local general student population. This resource guide is directed towards professionals and practitioners who are interested in strategies, resources, programs, and research concerning inclusion, detracking, ability grouping, mainstreaming, and cooperative learning. It contains descriptions, cost, and contact information for selected (1) references, including newsletters and journal articles; (2) educational information centers; and (3) organizations. To the extent possible, the resources listed address students in vocational education and integrated programs.




PREFACE

Societal demands and legislative mandates have called for changes in the way we educate students, especially those traditionally served in special education or "tracked" into separate programs. There is growing sentiment to educate all students in programs which reflect the diversity of the local general student population. Strategies to decrease the isolation of students with disabilities include mainstreaming, least restrictive environment, and inclusion. Teaching strategies such as cooperative learning, curriculum integration, and project teaching are useful techniques in eliminating tracks such as general education, vocational education, and college prep.

This resource guide grew out of increasing requests for information from the Office of Special Populations on the inclusion of students with disabilities into regular education programs and on eliminating ability grouping and tracking. This guide contains descriptions, cost, and contact information for (1) references, including newsletters and journal articles; (2) educational information centers; and (3) organizations. It is more selective than comprehensive and, to the extent possible, highlights resources that address students in vocational education and integrated programs.

The publications section is divided into the following categories: general information, access and equity, program administration, professional development, curriculum and instruction, and comprehensive support services. There are separate sections for newsletters, journals, educational information centers, agencies, and organizations; exemplary programs and practices, including brief information on some of the state systems change grants that address vocational education and also students in the secondary and postsecondary levels; curriculum centers; and a listing of state-level personnel who are available to assist local educators.




THE OFFICE OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Mission

The Office of Special Populations works nationally to increase vocational program accessibility, quality, and availability for youth and adults from special populations. It is one of the five Dissemination and Training Programs in the National Center for Research in Vocational Education at the University of California at Berkeley.

Objectives

To increase awareness and understanding of critical issues in vocational special needs education:

To increase awareness and appreciation of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act's emphasis on ensuring the full participation of a diverse population of students in the full range of available school-to-work activities and opportunities.

To increase the use of available resources.

To initiate and support networks of professionals.

To promote exemplary program activity and the adoption of model practices.

To maximize the impact of the Office of Special Populations' resources and activities through collaborative activities with state and national organizations.

Staff

Dr. Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein, Director
E-Mail: maddy2@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Dr. Zipura Burac Matias, Associate Director
E-Mail: zburac@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Dr. Esmeralda S. Cunanan, Research Associate
E-Mail: cunanan@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Janet Kantenberger, Research Assistant
Linda Iliff, Administrative Assistant

Address

University of Illinois
Vocational and Technical Education
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
Fax: (217) 244-5632



PUBLICATIONS

General Information


Children with Exceptional Needs in Regular Classrooms
Cohen, L. G. (1992, January).
Washington, DC: National Education Association.

This book links the recent changes that have taken place in the education of students who have exceptional needs with the results of research and preferred instructional strategies. The book explores three themes: (1) changes that have occurred in the education of students who have exceptional needs, (2) the legal requirements in educating exceptional students, and (3) emerging trends and preferred practices for teaching exceptional students in the regular classroom. While most of the research recommends that all students be included in the regular classroom, some of the research urges that there needs to be careful thought about how all children can be included in regular classrooms. (183 pages, $11.95)

Address:
National Education Association Professional Library
P.O. Box 509
West Haven, CT 06516
(800) 229-4200


The Disadvantages of Tracking and Ability Grouping:
A Look at Cooperative Learning as an Alternative

Crosby, M. S., & Owens, E. M. (1993, March).
Clemson, SC: National Dropout Prevention Center.

Tracking/ability grouping is an educational practice that has existed for over 100 years. The authors of this article view tracking/ability grouping as a harmful educational practice which results in lower educational attainment and higher dropout rates, especially for students living in poverty and for minority students. They view cooperative learning strategies as effective alternatives for students who need optimum preparation for the challenges of citizenship for the twenty-first century. The authors list several cooperative learning models with proven benefits to students. Through their study, the authors have found that cooperative learning strategies appear to be more effective than tracking/ability grouping for increasing academic and social skills achievement of at-risk students. (8 pages; ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 358 184; cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


The Inclusion Revolution, Research Bulletin, 11
Rogers, J. (1993, May).

Written for Phi Delta Kappa members, this paper traces the inclusion movement and discusses issues affecting the implementation of inclusion for students with disabilities. The discussions focus on the "down side" of inclusion, how inclusion affects classmates, and supplementary aids and services. It includes definitions of terms that have been used to describe inclusion such as mainstreaming, full inclusion, and regular education initiatives. A list of resources and a checklist for evaluating whether school personnel practices are consistent with the best intentions of the inclusion movement are included. (6 pages, no charge)

Available From:
Office of Special Populations
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807


Inclusive Education and Transition. Impact, 5(3)
Thompson, S. (1992, Fall).
Minneapolis: Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota.

When developing an inclusive educational system, many challenges and questions can result. The author addresses these issues by offering suggested solutions from researchers and practitioners to improve the process of preparing students for life after school. The author also provides examples on how education personnel can design a workable system for students with disabilities. No matter what the "ideal system" may be for each school, the author strongly urges the establishment of an inclusive education system. (1 page, no charge)

Address:
Institute on Community Integration
College of Education
University of Minnesota
109 Pattee Hall
150 Pillsbury Drive, SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 624-4512


Inclusive Education for Learners with Severe Disabilities: Print and Media Resources
Vandercook, T., York, J., & Johnson, S. (Comps.). (1990, November).
Minneapolis: Institute on Community Integration, University of Minnesota.

The authors have compiled this resource guide in an effort to provide educators and families with information about including learners with severe disabilities into general education classes and school community life. The guide includes resources about successful inclusive education models and strategies, as well as materials that provide a sound rationale and empirical support for inclusion. The resources are listed alphabetically within ten categories: journals; journal articles; books and book chapters; newsletters; newsletter issues and articles; audiotapes; videotapes; organizations; and publications of the Institute on Community Integration of the University of Minnesota. (52 pages; ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 332 463; cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Issues and Research in Special Education, Volume I
Gaylord-Ross, R. (Ed.). (1990).
New York: Teachers College Press.

This first volume of Issues and Research in Special Education, a new offshoot of the Teachers College Press Special Education Series, brings together some of today's leading authorities on special education to examine the latest issues and research in this expanding field. The series is designed to provide professionals with an overview of significant developments and theoretical advances in special education. Volume I identifies key areas currently attracting attention and offers the perspectives of prominent researchers in the field. Topics in this book include research methods in special education, integration of students with severe and profound disabilities, research in vocational special education, education and community integration experiences of deaf adolescents and young adults, and dynamic assessment. This book will serve as a reference tool for teacher educators, researchers, professionals, and graduate students. (448 pages, $58.95)

Address:
Sue Heim
Teachers College Press
P.O. Box 20
Williston, VT 05495-0020
(802) 878-0315 in VT
(800) 488-2665
Fax: (802) 864-7626


LRE and the Placement of Students with Severe Disabilities. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 17(3)
Haring, K., Farron-Davis, F., Goetz, L., Karasoff, P., Sailor, W., & Zeph, L. (1992).
Seattle, WA: The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps.

In order to more closely identify and analyze factors that might influence national monitoring and reporting of LRE issues, this study examined the variability between states in the placement of students with severe disabilities in integrated or segregated settings. Three states, which represented urban, suburban, and rural population bases, participated in a survey requesting information on the number of and the educational placement of students with severe disabilities. Results from the study indicated that the means states utilize to obtain child count data for reporting under Section 618 of the Education for All Handicapped Children Act are not sufficient to meet present informational needs. (9 pages)

Address:
The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
29 W. Susquehanna Avenue, Suite 210
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 828-8274


A National Survey of Mainstreamed Hearing Impaired High School Sophomores. Journal of Rehabilitation, 51(1)
Gregory, J. F., Shanahan, T., & Walberg, H. J. (1985, January/ February/March).
Alexandria, VA: National Rehabilitation Association.

After the collection of data from high school sophomores with hearing impairment and their peers with normal hearing on demographic characteristics, academic achievement, and indices of motivation, contrasts between the two groups were evidenced in demographics. The students with hearing impairment tended to be a little older and also had a higher incidence of Hispanic background than the normal hearing group. Results from the survey showed statistically significant differences In the academic achievement of the students. The results revealed that the students with hearing impairment had an academic disadvantage. Results on the indices of motivation were somewhat mixed. Both groups reported taking essentially the same coursework and watched approximately the same amount of television. A difference between the two groups was found with the students with hearing impairment indicating that they did less homework and had less ambition for future plans. (4 pages)

Address:
National Rehabilitation Association
633 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 836-0850


Promoting Inclusion for All Students with Disabilities
Boundy, K. B. (1992, October).
Cambridge, MA: Center for Law and Education.

Despite federal provisions, children with disabilities have been isolated, provided less than meaningful alternatives, and denied equal educational opportunities. This paper outlines the barriers to full inclusion experienced by students with disabilities and the legal basis for establishing the rights of students with disabilities to be educated with their nondisabled peers. The author also suggests questions and strategies for advocates to consider to challenge exclusion or denial of full inclusion. (17 pages, $5.00)

Address:
Center for Law and Education
197 Friend Street
9th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 371-1166


Restructuring for Caring and Effective Education:
An Administrative Guide to Creating Heterogeneous Schools

Villa, R. A., Thousand, J. S., Stainback, W., & Stainback, S. (Eds.). (1992).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Restructuring schools to serve diverse students is a difficult process. It involves a "marriage" between two separate entities: regular and special education. The authors advocate this marriage and a rationale for restructuring towards heterogeneous schooling. This book assists schools in mapping a new direction for educational change. It also offers advice for forging the union and making it successful. The main focuses are on children with handicaps and mainstreaming. (362 pages; $30.00, plus shipping and handling)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Their Senior Year: Family and Service Provider Perspectives on the Transition from School to Adult Life for Young Adults with Disabilities. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 19(1)
Gallivan-Fenlon, A. (1994, Spring).
Seattle, WA: The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps.

The purpose of this research was to obtain information on the transition process from school to adult life for students with disabilities. From the data gathered on 11 students with disabilities, the following eight themes emerged: (1) differing future expectations for young adults with disabilities; (2) inconsistent implementation of special education curricula and lack of inclusive educational practices; (3) lack of transition-related knowledge; (4) hastily and poorly coordinated transition planning; (5) a prevalence of restrictive views on employment and community living opportunities for adults with disabilities; (6) low levels of family participation; (7) outcomes of unemployment and isolation for most young adult participants; and (8) significant benefits of supported employment and community inclusion. The article discusses implications from these themes and gives recommendations for service practices. (13 pages)

Address:
The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
29 W. Susquehanna Avenue, Suite 210
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 828-8274





PUBLICATIONS

Access and Equity


Ability Grouping, Aspirations, and Attainments: Evidence from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988. The Journal of Negro Education, 62(3)
Braddock, J. H., & Dawkins, M. P. (1993, Summer).
Washington, DC: Howard University.

Many schools have failed in providing basic opportunities for the development of literacy, social skills, and values to their students especially to students of color. The objective of the article is to clarify the magnitude of the problem of African American and other students' maldistributions across tracks and ability groups, as well as to examine the link between tracking and students' educational aspirations and attainments. The authors address these issues by utilizing a national survey which analyzes recent trends in secondary-level tracking, discusses the implications of tracking for the educational aspirations of the middle grade and high school attainments, and considers alternative strategies schools can use to address problems of student diversity and to develop effective instructional strategies for heterogeneous classes. The findings have many policy implications for equity and excellence in American education. The authors urge for alternatives in the education system of America that are effective and innovative in responding to student diversity. (13 pages)

Address:
The Journal of Negro Education
2400 6th Street, NW
Howard University
Washington, DC 20059
(202) 806-6100


Access and Equity in Vocational Education (Trends and Issues Alerts)
ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education. (1988).
Columbus, OH: Author.

In order to serve members of special needs groups successfully, vocational educators must create programs that are both accessible and equitable. To address this concern, this document begins with an overview of trends and issues in the area of access and equity in vocational education. The overview briefly addresses emphasis in federal vocational education legislation on support of increased vocational education opportunities for special target populations, lack of success to date in certain areas of access and equity, and the bases of future policy to support access and equity goals. A list of ERIC resources, other print resources, and organizations that provide information about access and equity are included. (2 pages; no charge; ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 307 381)

Address:
ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education
Ohio State University
1900 Kenny Road
Columbus, OH 43210-1090
(614) 292-4353
(800) 848-4815


Access to and Use of Vocational Education in Teen Parent Programs
Zellman, G. L., Feifer, C., & Hirsch, A. E. (1992, August).
Berkeley: National Center for Research In Vocational Education, University of California at Berkeley.

What role does vocational education have in programs for pregnant and parenting teens? What role should it have? Until recently, most programs for these groups have seldom offered vocational education to enrollees. This report examines the range of vocational education opportunities available to young mothers in teen parent programs; explores the degree of access to these opportunities; examines vocational education use; and assesses the likely impact of the Family Support Act on teen parents and on the programs that serve them. Discussions within the report address the issues and dilemmas that underlie reduced use and utility of vocational education in programs for pregnant and parenting teens. Considerations to be discussed by program planners and vocational educators serving these groups are identified. (MDS-152, 92 pages, $6.50)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
46 Horrabin Hall
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652


Access to Post-Secondary Education: A Faculty Handbook (Rev. Ed.)
Kercher, P., & Parisot, A. (1989).
Great Falls, MT: Great Falls Vocational-Technical Center.

Developed by Project ACCESS staff, this handbook was designed to assist faculty who teach at the postsecondary level to better understand and make academic accommodations for students with disabilities, thereby improving their chances for success and maximizing their educational opportunities. This handbook suggests adjustments which can be made in the environment or in teaching styles to accommodate specialized needs without affecting academic integrity. The information in this handbook should help eliminate barriers to learning and serve as a general guide for maximizing educational opportunities. (38 pages, $5.00)

Address:
Montana State University
College of Technology
2100 16th Avenue South
Great Falls, MT 59405
(406) 771-7140


Annotated Resource List: Women and Girls in Vocational Education
Technical Assistance for Special Populations Program. (1992, October).
Berkeley: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, University of California at Berkeley.

The Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act of 1990 contains a number of provisions designed to improve the academic and economic outcomes of women and girls in vocational education. This listing is designed to support efforts to improve the access of women and girls to high quality vocational education programs. (MDS-478, 25 pages, $2.25)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
46 Horrabin Hall
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652


Blueprints for Indian Education: Research and Development Needs for the 1990S
Cahape, P. (1993, March).
Charleston, WV: ERIC/CRESS, Appalachia Educational Laboratory.

Two landmark efforts to describe the condition of American Indian and Alaska Native education nationwide and to call for specific solutions took place in the early 1990s. These efforts were (1) the Indian Nations At Risk Task Force (INARTF) and (2) the White House Conference on Indian Education (WHCIE). The work of the INARTF and WHCIE resulted with many clear directives to improve American Indian and Alaskan Native education. This Digest is the first in a planned series that presents the findings of the Task Force and Conference. It synthesizes research, development, evaluation, and dissemination needs related to American Indian and Alaska Native education. (2 pages, no charge)

Address:
ERIC/CRESS
Appalachia Educational Laboratory
P.O. Box 1348
Charleston, WV 25325


Decisions in Sequence: How to Make Placements in the Least Restrictive Environment. EDLAW Briefing Paper, 2(9-10)
Champagne, J. F., & Rosenfeld, S. J. (1993, March-April).
Potomac, MD: EDLAW, Inc.

This EDLAW Briefing Paper addresses both the problem of what constitutes placement in the least restrictive environment and how that placement is to be realized in a manner that is sound both conceptually and legally, while providing a methodology that can be easily implemented. After providing definitions of terms associated with the least restrictive environment, the primary discussion examines the factors affecting placement decisions and proposes a model for making decisions that conform with what the law requires. In addition, the model is tested against case law; this analysis is presented separately in the boxed text that appears on each page. Requests for permission to reprint and distribute this issue are encouraged and will be treated liberally. (17 pages)

Address:
EDLAW, Inc.
P.O. Box 59105
Potomac, MD 20859-9105
(301) 983-2543


Educational Programs and Achievements of Secondary Special Education Students: Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study
Wagner, M., & Shaver, D. M. (1989, March).
Menlo Park, CA: SRI International.

In 1983, Congress mandated that the U.S. Department of Education conduct a national study of youth in the years of transition from secondary school to adult living. This study addresses three major questions: (1) what educational programs and other services are provided to secondary special education students, (2) how well secondary special education students do in school, and (3) what student characteristics are related to school performance. The findings reported offer some new information regarding school programs of secondary youth with disabilities. While schools were the primary provider of services such as speech therapy, personal counseling, and occupational therapy for secondary special education students, more than half of the students received none of the services investigated as adjuncts to their special education instructional program. New insights on school achievement are also discussed. (43 pages, $5.00)

Address:
SRI International
Social Sciences BS178
333 Ravenswood Avenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493
(415) 859-5109


Ensuring Quality School-to-Work Opportunities for Young Women
Milgram, D., & Watkins, K. (1994, March).
Washington, DC: Wider Opportunities for Women.

Results from a study conducted in 1993 by Wider Opportunities for Women (WOW) investigate how some of the U.S. Department of Labor's School-to-Work Transition demonstration sites were serving young women. WOW's findings show that new and supposedly "state-of-the-art" training continues to perpetuate sex bias and sex stereotyping that can result in continued wage disparities between men and women. However, WOW noted that young women can succeed in nontraditional school-to-work programs. The report features the success of the Manufacturing Technology Partnership in Flint, Michigan, a model nontraditional School-to-Work Transition demonstration site, in recruiting and retaining young women in automotive technology. WOW strongly recommends that legislative initiatives focusing on the training of women for nontraditional jobs be passed and actively implemented as part of School-to-Work Opportunities Act programs. (14 pages, no charge)

Address:
Wider Opportunities for Women
815 15th Street, NW
Suite 916
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 638-3143
Fax: (202) 638-4885


Factors That Affect Nontraditional Vocational Enrollment Among Women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 9
Houser, B. B., & Garvey, C. (1985, March).
New York: Cambridge University Press.

Personality and external factors differentiate women who enter male-dominated vocational training programs from those who only consider entering such programs and from those who enter female-dominated programs. Four hundred seventy women who were enrolled in California vocational training programs, stratified on both social class and type of vocational training site, completed a self-administered questionnaire covering (1) demographic/family background, (2) social support/encouragement from others, (3) peer experience with nontraditional programs, and (4) personality and sex-role orientation. Results revealed that the student subgroups differed most significantly in the amount of support, encouragement, and discouragement they received from the important others in their lives. Nontraditional students differed from traditional students primarily in the support of female friends and family members. In addition, nontraditional students differed from those who only considered entering a nontraditional vocational program in the amount of encouragement from school personnel. Recommendations are made for steps that can be taken to foster equality of educational opportunity. (13 pages)

Address:
Cambridge University Press
40 W. 20th Street
New York, NY 10011
(800) 872-7423


Final Report, Volume V: Handicapped and Disadvantaged Students: Access to Quality Vocational Education
Hayward, B. J., & Wirt, J. G. (1989, August).
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Assessment of Vocational Education.

This report describes the access of high school students who are disabled and academically disadvantaged to vocational education and analyzes the quality of the programs in which these students participate. Questions addressed include whether disabled and academically disadvantaged students have access to a full range of high-quality vocational programs, how demographic characteristics affect such access, and to what extent vocational programs and course-taking options differ across schools. It also contains implications of the findings for federal resources targeting. Recommendations include expansion of female disabled and disadvantaged students' enrollments in nontraditional programs; increased participation in cooperative education; emphasis on expanding placement activities; targeting of funds for schools with high concentrations of special needs students; and the availability of occupationally specific programs in area vocational schools, particularly for female and minority students. (100 pages, no charge)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(703) 440-1400


The Growing Need for Quality Vocational Education Programs for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP), (TASPP Brief, 1(4)
Coyle-Williams, M. A. (1989, December).
Champaign: University of Illinois, National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Technical Assistance for Special Populations Program.

A significant and increasing number of Americans speak a language other than English at home. It is crucial that vocational education programs are capable of meeting the needs of these individuals. This BRIEF highlights recent research related to LEP individuals in vocational education. The following topics are reviewed: educational and economic correlates of limited English proficiency, problems encountered by members of this minority group in trying to access vocational education programs, the components of exemplary vocational programs for LEP individuals, and research needs. (4 pages, no charge)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Office of Special Populations
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807


A Guide to Occupational Education for Students with Handicapping Conditions
University of the State of New York, The State Education Department. (1990, September).
Albany: Author.

It is necessary to provide information to special education and occupational education administrators and teachers that will help them better serve students with disabilities in occupational education programs. Included in the guide are definitions of various disabilities and occupational education. Descriptions of an assessment model, a two-stage process for developing an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), and the education continuum are included along with suggestions for coordination of special education, occupational education, and vocational rehabilitation. (18 pages, no charge)

Address:
Office for Education of Children with Handicapping Conditions
Division of Program Development
Education Building Annex, Room 1073
Albany, NY 12234


HEATH Resource Directory, 1991
Davie, A. R. (Ed.). (1991).
Washington, DC: HEATH Resource Center.

This biannual directory contains updated annotations about more than 150 national organizations useful to those concerned about postsecondary education and disability issues. Topics include advocacy, access, and awareness; community integration; disability-specific organizations; funding; legal assistance; and technology. Contact information is included for the Regional Technical Assistance Offices of the Office of Civil Rights. A toll-free listing of resources concludes the directory. (35 pages, no charge)

Address:
HEATH Resource Center
One Dupont Circle
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036-1193
(202) 939-9320
(800) 544-3284


Immigrant Students: Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools: A Guide for Advocates and Educators
Carrera, Esq., J. W. (1989).
Boston: National Coalition of Advocates for Students, The Immigrant Student Program.

The manual addresses prohibited and recommended Plyler (the Supreme Court ruling on the right of access of immigrant children to public schools) right of access practices for educators, advocates, and school lawyers. The first section outlines prohibited and recommended everyday school practices. The second section addresses the Plyler right of access and the legal reasoning behind it. The role that parents and community members need to play to ensure that schools abide by and respect the Plyler rights of immigrant students is also discussed in the third section. Included also are supplements pertaining to legal information affecting nonimmigrant students in the U.S. and regulations and policy statements which may serve as models for advocates in other school districts. (51 pages, $12.00)

Address:
National Coalition of Advocates for Students
100 Boylston Street
Suite 737
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 357-8507


Issues in Vocational Education for Special Populations in Rural Areas, (TASPP Brief, 2(2)
Rojewski, J. W. (1990, October).
Champaign: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Technical Assistance for Special Populations Program, University of Illinois.

Some of the problems which practitioners face when serving students with special needs in rural vocational education programs are identified in this BRIEF. The following solutions which have been proposed to eliminate these barriers are examined: educational cooperatives, administrative action, use of available technology, entrepreneurship, school/business partnerships, and mobile facilities units. (6 pages, no charge, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 326 630)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Office of Special Populations
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807


Manual for Accessibility, Conference, Meeting, and Lodging Facilities as Adopted by the National Rehabilitation Association (Rev. Ed.)
National Rehabilitation Association. (1988).
Alexandria, VA: Author.

A significant percentage of our population has difficulty accessing the environment due to permanent or temporary disabilities, and there is widespread misunderstanding about what constitutes minimum standards of accessibility. This illustrated manual describes the National Rehabilitation Association's criteria used in selecting meeting sites and making meetings accessible to people with disabilities. The manual also serves as an orientation and training resource within the Association and for use with business and industry, especially with hotels, convention centers, and restaurants. It includes survey forms designed to be used to evaluate accessibility. (30 pages, $75.00)

Address:
National Rehabilitation Association
633 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 836-0850 Voice
(703) 836-0852 TDD


A Model to Improve the Quality and Quantity of Minority Student Participation in Vocational-Technical Education Programs
Illinois State Board of Education, Department of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education. (Comp). (1991, October).
Springfield: Illinois State Board of Education.

A model for improving the participation of minorities in vocational-technical programs is presented in this handbook. Implemented at Dawson Technical Institute, one of the City Colleges of Chicago, the model consists of eight components: (1) recruitment, (2) intake/ admissions, (3) assessment, (4) counseling/career planning, (5) financial aid/registration, (6) program placement/retention, (7) job placement, and (8) follow-up/evaluation. The handbook provides a description of each component. The appendix, which contains samples of materials (e.g., letters, assessment forms, course outline, and evaluation sheets), would be of great help to those interested in adopting the model. (51 pages, excluding appendix; $6.25; Item #445)

Address:
Curriculum Publications Clearinghouse
Western Illinois University
46 Horrabin Hall
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 322-3905


New Voices: Immigrant Students in U.S. Public Schools
National Coalition of Advocates for Students. (1988).
Boston: Author.

This report documents the encounter between the children of the great immigration wave of the 1970s-1980s and U.S. public schools. It identifies a host of problems which these students and the schools create for each other, and offers recommendations for change in school policy and practice, which would make public schools more responsive to immigrant and LEP children's needs. (176 pages; single copy, prepaid price for schools libraries, and other institutions, $12.95; single copy, prepaid price for individuals, $9.95; add $2.00 per copy for postage and handling)

Address:
National Coalition of Advocates for Students
100 Boylston Street
Suite 737
Boston, MA 02116
(617) 357-8507


Participation of Special Education Students in High School Vocational Education: The Influence of School Characteristics
Kaufman, P. (1989, November).
Berkeley: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, University of California at Berkeley.

Using data from the High School Transcript Study of the Class of 1987, this paper explores the characteristics which distinguish schools that enroll large proportions of their handicapped students in vocational education courses. The school characteristics examined describe the ecological and sociological environment of the school.

The researchers found that schools serving disadvantaged populations and schools with relatively large enrollments enrolled fewer students with handicaps in vocational education overall and fewer students with handicaps in mainstream vocational education courses. The author offers explanations for the findings presented. (MDS-019, 50 pages, $4.00)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
46 Horrabin Hall
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652


School-College Alliances: Benefits for Low-Income Minorities (ERIC Digest No. 53)
Ascher, C., & Schwartz, W. (1989).
New York: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education.

The encouraged growth of high school-college collaboration is promoted in this Digest as the means to provide equal access to educational opportunities for disadvantaged minority students. Student development, and school and college improvement are discussed separately in answering the question of why schools and colleges collaborate. Types of collaborative activities, the process of collaboration, and networks of collaboratives are also discussed. In conclusion, the issues of control and who really benefits are primary concerns of the process. (1 page, no charge)

Address:
ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education
Teachers College
Columbia University
Institute for Urban and Minority Education
Main Hall, Room 300
Box 40
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027-9998
(212) 678-3433


School-to-Work Transition Services for Disadvantaged Youth Enrolled in Vocational Education
Reisner, E. R., & Balasubramaniam, M. (1989, March).
Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, National Assessment of Vocational Education.

Conducted as part of the National Assessment of Vocational Education, this study is intended to contribute to the development of federal strategies for improving the delivery of transition services to disadvantaged students enrolled in vocational education. Two issues are examined: (1) the circumstances underlying the school-to-work transition problems of disadvantaged youth, and (2) strategies that school systems have adopted to address these problems.

Problems that limit the disadvantaged youth's labor market success are discussed in the study. Four school districts offering transition-related services were also studied. To encourage more successful school-to-work transitions, while accommodating current diversity in local circumstances and preferences, the study suggests that federal vocational education programming adopt a new priority on improving linkages between disadvantaged youth and employers. Program components identified as playing key roles in encouraging the creation of employer linkages with disadvantaged youth include early intervention; the availability of tutors, mentors, and advocates; supervised work experience; and placement assistance. (64 pages, no charge)

Address:
U.S. Department of Education
Office of Vocational and Adult Education
600 Independence Avenue, SW
Switzer Building
Washington, DC 20202-7241
(202) 205-8270


Step by Step: The Educational Equity Options Project. A Program Manual
Beck, J. A. (1989).
Washington, DC: Wider Opportunities for Women.

This manual provides a step-by-step process for implementing the Educational Equity Options (EEO) Project, and serves as a catalyst for sex equity activities within an educational institution. Developed by Wider Opportunities for Women, EEO is a seven-step approach to increase the number of female students entering and succeeding in nontraditional occupational education. Contained in this manual is an overview of the seven steps and a detailed guide on how to implement the project. A selected list of educational equity resources is also included. (180 pages, $45.00)

Address:
Wider Opportunities for Women
815 15th Street, NW
Suite 916
Washington, DC 20005
(202) 638-3143
Fax: (202) 638-4885


Successful Detracking in Middle and Senior High Schools (ERIC Digest No. 82)
Ascher, C. (1992, October).
New York: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Institute for Urban and Minority Education.

Although tracking remains controversial, there has been a recent policy consensus that the negative effects of tracking on lower track students are so severe that schools should move towards detracking. This digest identifies and explains the factors that lead to successful detracking. It briefly describes the accelerated schools--a school restructuring model that has been successful In detracking. (2 pages, no charge)

Address:
ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education
Teachers College
Columbia University
Institute for Urban and Minority Education
Main Hall, Room 300
Box 40
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027-9998
(212) 678-3433


Vocational Education for Special Populations: Recommendations for Improving State Policy
Phelps, L. A., Wermuth, T. R., & Crain, R. L. (1991, September).
Berkeley: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, University of California at Berkeley.

Three aspects of equity embedded in the Perkins Act are examined in this paper: (1) the extent of access which special needs youth and adults have to programs and services, (2) the effectiveness of various programs and services locally received, and (3) outcomes realized by special students participating in vocational education. The examination is accomplished through summaries of recent studies, related evaluative and empirical literature, and data from longitudinal studies. The paper gives primary attention to youth who are disabled, disadvantaged, or limited English proficient in secondary vocational education programs.

A set of general conclusions and recommendations for improving state policy is presented. These recommendations should be of interest to policymakers at both the state and federal levels as they examine alternatives for implementing the 1990 Amendments to the Perkins Act (PL 101 392). The appendix contains brief summaries of major studies of vocational education programs effectively serving students with special needs. (MDS-031, 66 pages, $5.00, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 336 567)

Address:
National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
46 Horrabin Hall
1 University Circle
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652


Vocational Education Performance Standards (ERIC Digest No. 96)
Imel, S. (1990).
Columbus, OH: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education.

This digest focuses on vocational education experiences with outcome measures, describes proposed approaches, and enumerates potential issues and challenges in establishing performance standards for vocational education. The Digest describes three outcome measures and discusses the assets and drawbacks of each: (1) labor market outcomes (placement, earnings, and employment duration); (2) learning outcomes (measures of occupational competency); and (3) access outcomes (access to vocational programs by women, minorities, and special needs students). It recommends using a combined set of indicators that address each of these issues, and refers to two such programs in Iowa and Minnesota. Issues, challenges, and potential problems in implementing performance standards are described, including the impact on learners, the influence of program type, and the difficulty of setting minimum standards. It concludes that there are both positive and negative aspects to performance measurement. A list of references is included. (1 page, no charge)

Address:
ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education
Ohio State University
1900 Kenny Road
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-4353
(800) 848-4815


Vocational Education: Status in School Year 1990-91 and Early Signs of Change at Secondary Level
U.S. General Accounting Office. (1993, July).
Gaithersburg, MD: Author.

The Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act Amendments of 1990 required the General Accounting Office (GAO) to conduct studies to determine changes occurring in vocational education programs after the amendments took place. This interim report provides preliminary information to the House Education and Labor Committee and to the vocational education community on (1) the status of vocational programs in secondary schools in school year 1990-1991 and (2) changes reported in school year 1991-1992.

The GAO's study presented the following major findings: (1) many quality components are missing in most schools, but districts have reported that change has begun; (2) students who were members of targeted groups participated in vocational education programs at rates equal to or higher than other students in the school years immediately preceding and following the 1990 amendments; and (3) there is a need to improve data collection efforts so that adequate assessment of vocational education can take place. (88 pages, no charge)

Address:
U.S. General Accounting Office
P.O. Box 6015
Gaithersburg, MD 20884-6015
(202) 512-6000





PUBLICATIONS

Program Administration


Alternative Education Programs: A Prescription for Success
Hefner-Packer, R. (1990).
Athens: University of Georgia, College of Education.

Not all students respond positively to a traditional education program structure or instruction. Many have needs and interests that require alternative curricula, alternative modes of instruction, and alternative organizational structures. If alternative education programs are not available to these students, many will lose interest, become disruptive, fail, or drop out. Carefully planned and implemented educational alternatives increase the probability of success for nontraditional students. This report is intended to offer suggestions and strategies for planning and implementing alternative education programs.

This publication includes descriptions of five commonly accepted models, including alternative classroom, school-within-a-school, separate alternative school, continuation school, and magnet school; successful programs in Georgia; a strategy for planning alternative programs based on local school and community needs; and a strategy for effective program implementation.

The appendices contain suggested forms such as an alternative education survey, needs assessment, and a form for gathering student information. Lists of funding sources and alternative educational programs in Georgia and elsewhere are also included. (130 pages, $10.00)

Address:
University of Georgia
College of Education
c/o Dr. C. Thomas Holmes
G-10 Aderhold Hall
Athens, GA 30602


Beyond Separate Education: Quality Education for All
Lipsky, D. K., & Gartner, A. (Eds.). (1989).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Schools need to be reformed in order to make them meaningful and effective for all students. This publication addresses the mission of PL 94-142 in the second decade of its implementation. The book chapters were written for general and special educators, parents, and policymakers. The chapters are divided into four sections: (1) background and current situation; (2) classrooms and schools; (3) teachers, parents, and students; and (4) next steps. In section one, chapters address issues concerning the current educational system and school improvement. Section two focuses on integrating students with disabilities and disadvantages educationally, socially, and vocationally. Different programs and adaptive instruction are also discussed. Chapters detailing teacher preparation, the roles of parents, whether or not the laws have made a difference from the perspective of some students with disabilities, and the relationships of students with each other in integrated classrooms are found in section three. Section four concludes the book by overviewing the politics of special education, the right to an effective education, and the building for the future. (336 pages, $32.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Challenges for a Service System in Transition: Ensuring Quality Community Experiences for Persons with Developmental Disabilities
Hayden, M. F., & Abery, B. H. (Eds.). (1994).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

A movement toward deinstitutionalization, community living opportunities, and fuller recognition of the citizenship of persons with disabilities has revolutionized the service delivery system of the country. This book examines community living research and policy to promote full community inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities. It addresses issues that affect the lives of persons with developmental disabilities and provides a better understanding of the challenges of designing and maintaining a responsive service system. Topics covered include promoting community inclusion and social relationship; enhancing independence and autonomy; assuring quality of services and supports; recruiting, training, and retaining services personnel; and financing and budgeting residential and related services. (499 pages, $35.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Detracking Schools: Early Lessons from the Field. Phi Delta Kappan, 73(6)
Oakes, J., & Lipton, M. (1992, February).
Bloomington, IN: Phi Delta Kappa.

The authors suggest that tracking and ability-grouped class assignments have had negative consequences for most children. One national report identifies tracking as a barrier for many students' paths to college. Through their research, the authors have discovered that a culture of detracking is more important than the specific strategy chosen. School models that successfully detrack possess characteristics that help to build a culture of detracking: (1) recognition that tracking is supported by powerful norms that must be acknowledged and addressed as alternatives are created; (2) willingness to broaden the reform agenda, so that changes in the tracking structure become part of a comprehensive set of changes in school practice; (3) engagement in a process of inquiry and experimentation that is idiosyncratic, opportunistic, democratic, and politically sensitive; (4) alterations in teachers' roles and responsibilities, including changes in the ways adults in the school work together; and (5) persistence over the long haul that is sustained by risk-taking leaders who are clearly focused on scholarship and democratic values. (7 pages, $4.50/single issue)

Address:
Phi Delta Kappa Inc.
408 N. Union
P.O. Box 789
Bloomington, IN 47402
(800) 766-1156
(812) 339-1156


The Integration of Students with Special Needs into Regular Classrooms: Policies and Practices That Work
National Education Association, Education Policy and Professional Practice. (1992, May).
Washington, DC. National Education Association.

Efforts to integrate students with special needs and regular students are becoming very controversial. This publication is the product of a discussion and debate participated in by regular and special education teachers and representatives of the educational research and policy, practice, teaching, and advocacy group communities. They examined practices that lead to the successful inclusion of students with special needs in regular education classrooms. Three papers present the policy perspective on what works from the view of parental, teacher stakeholders, local, and state. In addition, three papers present the research perspective on how to create quality in schools and classrooms. (63 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 353 708; cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Integration of Visually Handicapped Students in Industrial Education Classes: An Overview. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 78(7)
McConnell, J. (1984, September).
New York: American Foundation for the Blind.

Many issues need to be addressed in order to successfully integrate students with visual impairment into industrial education classes. These issues include attitudes of teacher and student, teachers' familiarity with visual Impairments, orientation and mobility training, class size, safety provisions, curriculum modification, acquisition of and training with adaptive equipment, and educational resource support. The author stresses the importance of inservice training as it can provide educators with an explanation, experiences, and understanding of visual impairments, teaching techniques, available aids, and resources. (4 pages)

Address:
Publications and Information Services Department
American Foundation for the Blind
49 Sheridan Ave
Albany, NY 12210
(800) 877-2693


Nasty Girls, Thugs, and Humans Like Us: Social Relations Between Severely Disabled and Nondisabled Students in High School
Murray-Seegert, C. (1989).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

The goal of this book is to enhance the understanding of events that occur when teenagers with disabilities attend a regular high school. The author describes the experience of a participant-observer in an inner-city high school of the San Francisco Unified School District and documents how a school's integration program affected student relations and teacher practices. The author presents the results of an ecological analysis of the school's social system and relates these results to quality education, student diversity, and social inequality. The book provides a historical and theoretical perspective on the special education work at an inner-city high school, describes the school's social and physical environment with a concentration on the interaction between disabled and nondisabled students (and the students' understanding of those contacts), and analyzes the school's social ecology speculating about future research and educational practice. (216 pages, $22.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Promoting Effective Educational Practices Through Public School and University Partnerships: A Tale of One City's Response to Full Integration
Tompkins, F. M. (1992, April).
Green Bay: University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

This paper presents a report on a three-year integration project In progress in an elementary school located in Green Bay, Wisconsin. The report is intended to describe the first year's activities and findings and outline plans for the next two years. Three questions were the focus of the study: (1) What are the current integration practices employed within the school?, (2) What evidence do we have to show that integration results in academic success for students with exceptional educational needs?, and (3) What are the current perceptions of teachers, parents, and students regarding the current integration practices implemented in the school? The results shed some light on the perceptions teachers hold on full integration. Also included is a listing, based on a relevant literature review, of essential elements for effective integration practices. (27 pages, no charge)

Address:
Francine M. Tompkins
University of Wisconsin-Green Bay
2420 Nicolet Drive
Green Bay, WI 54311-7001
(414) 465-2003


Report Card to the Nation on Inclusion in Education of Students with Mental Retardation
Davis, S. (1992, October).
Arlington, TX: The ARC.

To determine the extent to which children with mental retardation are being educated in inclusive settings, The Arc analyzed the latest data on educational placements of students with mental retardation contained in the Fourteenth Annual Report to Congress on the Implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (1992). The report summarizes data for the 1989-90 school year reported by all states to the federal government regarding children receiving special education and related services.

This report provides an analysis of national and state data on the following questions: (a) To what extent are children with mental retardation being educated in the same classrooms as their nondisabled peers?, (b) To what extent are states using resource rooms to educate students with mental retardation?, (c) To what extent are students with mental retardation being educated In separate classrooms?, (d) To what extent are students with mental retardation being educated in separate schools?, and (e) What percentage of students with mental retardation receive their education in separate classrooms and separate schools? The paper concludes by providing a summary of major findings, a discussion, and a call to action. (28 pages, single copy, no charge)

Address:
Tammy Fortune or Rickie Gallmon
Division of Adult Education and Literacy Clearinghouse
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-7240
(202) 732-2396


Secondary Programs for Students with Developmental Disabilities
McDonnell, J., Wilcox, B., & Hardman, M. L. (1991).
Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Critical issues in the design and implementation of secondary programs for students with developmental disabilities are addressed in this book. Current research on best practices in secondary programs is presented, as well as goals that may be used to guide program operation. Strategies are included for individualized education and transition planning development procedures, the design of community and classroom instructional programs, and the promotion of the full integration of students with developmental disabilities into the school and community. Procedures are outlined for carrying out employment training, conducting training on personal management and leisure activities, and supporting the involvement of parents in the educational program. Each of the chapters includes practical guidelines and forms to be used by classroom teachers. (315 pages, $34.50)

Address:
Allyn & Bacon
160 Gould Street
Needham Heights, MA 02194-2310
(800) 852-8024


Social Integration and Severe Disabilities: A Longitudinal Analysis of Child Outcomes. The Journal of Special Education, 25(3)
Cole, D. A., & Meyer, L. H. (1991).

The goal of social integration is shared across disciplines and espoused as a universal value in today's society; however, considerable controversy exists regarding the process most likely to result in the attainment of this goal for persons with severe disabilities. Proponents of traditional rehabilitation-remedial models propose delivery of intensive services in segregated environments especially designed to meet individual needs. Conversely, proponents of full inclusion models maintain that services be provided in the mainstream of school and society. In the current study, the effects of integrated versus segregated schooling upon the educational and social competence of children with severe developmental disabilities were examined across a two-year time period, using both classroom observation and standardized child-assessment measures. Children in integrated learning environments spent less time with therapists, equal time with special education teachers, more time with teaching assistants, more time with children with and without handicaps, and less time alone than did children in segregated learning environments. No differences were found on a traditional measure of developmental skills; however, on a measure of social competence, integrated children progressed, whereas segregated children regressed. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of public attitudes toward disability and educational reform in the mainstream of America's schools. (12 pages)

Address:
The Journal of Special Education
c/o Pro-Ed Publishers
8700 Shoal Creek Boulevard
Austin, TX 78757-6897
(512) 451-3246


Techniques for Including Students with Disabilities:
A Step-by-Step Practical Guide for School Principals

Shinsky, E. J. (1992).
Lansing, Ml: MPI School and Instructional Supplies.

This guide is designed for use by school principals, teachers, district directors, school improvement teams, directors and supervisors of special education, superintendents and boards of education. Its purpose is to assist educators in organizing a school environment that is accepting, responsive, and accountable, when striving to include students with disabilities throughout the school.

The first four chapters focus on essential components for effectively including students with disabilities. The remaining chapters address specific areas identified by building-level staff, principals, and parents as needing attention in facilitating the successful inclusion of students with disabilities in the school setting. In addition to the content, each chapter includes the following Information: building checklist, suggested ways to enhance the school environment, goal development and plan of action. (377 pages; $59.95, plus $2.50 shipping and handling)

Address:
MPI School and Instructional Supplies
1200 Keystone Avenue
P.O. Box 24155
Lansing, Ml 48909-4155
(800) 444-1773
Fax: (517) 393-8884


Transitions to Least Restrictive Environments: A Guide to Transition (Rev. Ed.)
Beninghof, A. M. (1991, July).
Windsor, CT: Capitol Region Education Council.

The transition of special education students to less restrictive environments or from school to work stresses the importance of planning and communication during the entire process, from initial plans through implementation and follow-up. Section one of this guide consists of a transition process checklist to aid in the organization and follow through of transition activities. Section two consists of answers to commonly asked questions about each of the following steps in the transition process: Individualized Education Plan (IEP) design, placement, change in living arrangements, assessment, timing, instruction, staff identification, staff needs assessment, staff training, visits by staff to the current placement, visits by staff/parents to the new placement, visits by the student to the new placement, the transition team, IEP modification, the student schedule, peer "sensitization," informing regular education parents, curriculum and evaluation modification, plant modification and equipment, transportation, coordination of related services, communication systems, students' records, medical services, transition, the student support group, support activities for family and siblings, the follow-up support team, and monitoring and modification. Appendices include a sample ecological inventory, a transition timeline, a listing of topics related to the least restrictive environment, and a student checklist. (68 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 337 939, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Untracking and College Enrollment: Research Report 4
Mehan, H., Datnow, A., Bratton, E., Tellez, C., Friedlaender, D., & Ngo, T. (1992).
Santa Cruz: University of California at Santa Cruz.

Preliminary results of a program which was administered as an alternative to compensatory education are presented in this study. Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is an untracking program developed by the San Diego school system. The program places low-achieving students in college preparatory classes and provides them with a strong system of social and academic supports. This research report examines the educational consequences of the AVID untracking program as measured by students' college enrollment. Preliminary results demonstrate that AVID students are enrolling in college in percentages that exceed local and national averages. (25 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 351 403, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Why Ability Grouping Must End: Achieving Excellence and Equity in American Education
Braddock, J. H., & Slavin, R. E. (1992, September).
Baltimore, MD: Center for Research on Effective Schooling for Disadvantaged Students, Johns Hopkins University.

This review of research focuses on policies and practices that result in placing students in groups that are more or less homogeneous with respect to academic performance. Braddock and Slavin's recent analysis of data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 provides the largest and best-controlled multi-year study of ability grouping ever conducted. The outcomes of scores of studies have been similar, and these outcomes are discussed in the following categories: (1) opportunities to learn; (2) ability grouping and achievement; (3) ability grouping and segregation; (4) ability grouping and intergroup relations; (5) ability grouping, self-esteem, and feelings of inferiority; (6) ability grouping, delinquency, and dropouts; and (7) alternatives to ability grouping. The research proves how ability grouping must end because it is ineffective, harmful to many students, and damaging to interracial relations and democratic society. Effective and practical alternatives exist. Public schools must provide more equitable access to learning opportunities that develop reasoning, inference, and critical thinking skills. Major school restructuring will be necessary to develop the needed alternatives. (24 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 355 296, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Winners All: A Call for Inclusive Schools
National Association of State Boards of Education Study Group on Special Education. (1992, October).
Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Boards of Education.

Dual special education/general education bureaucracies that exist today in most states have hindered collaboration between special and general educators. This report presents the result of the National Association of State Boards of Education Study Group on Special Education's two-year study on the state of special education. The study group recommends the creation of an inclusive system that strives to produce better outcomes for ALL students. In such a system, special educational services are provided as a support to students who need them in order to achieve the outcomes expected of all students, and general education and specialized services complement and support each other.

To create this new system, the group recommends that state boards (1) provide leadership in creating a new belief system and vision for education in their states; (2) foster collaborative partnerships and joint training programs between general educators and special educators; and (3) work with state departments of education to revise funding, placement, and labeling. (44 pages; $10, including postage and handling)

Address:
National Association of State Boards of Education
1012 Cameron Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 684-4000
(703) 836-2313





PUBLICATIONS

Professional Development


Collaborative Teaming for Inclusion-Oriented Schools: A Resource Manual
Kansas State Board of Education. (1992, December).
Topeka: Author.

This resource manual focuses on the development and enhancement of student program planning teams in schools oriented to inclusive education of students with disabilities. First, the terms "inclusion," "integration," and "mainstreaming" are clarified. Then, the challenge of developing instructional and behavioral plans that allow students to learn together is emphasized, outlining the need for administrative support, shared ownership of all children, collaborative teams, year-round transition and program planning, access to consultation and technical support, staff development, and school and home collaboration. The manual defines a "team" as a set of interpersonal relationships structured to achieve established goals. Members of the student planning team are listed. Essential elements of effective teams are discussed, including positive interdependence, face-to-face interaction, individual accountability, development of collaborative skills, and group processing. Appendices provide team activities, various team forms, a team member checklist, and a team self-evaluation checklist. (44 pages, no charge, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 359 742)

Address:
Education Service Center
P.O. Box 189
Girard, KS 66743
(316) 724-6281
Fax: (316) 724-6284


Developing Effective Vocational Programs for Mentally Retarded Persons: Cooperative Planning Between Rehabilitation and Education. Journal of Rehabilitation, 52(2)
Langone, J., & Gill, D. H. (1986, April/May/June).
Alexandria, VA: National Rehabilitation Association.

Techniques for improving the effectiveness of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) as a management plan are presented in this article. The authors mentioned six specific strategies which included identifying appropriate vocational program goals, identifying potential employment opportunities, assessing present levels of vocational performance, translating program goals into performance objectives, identifying needed support services, and establishing evaluative criteria. The importance of a meaningful, working relationship between rehabilitation specialists and educators is stressed as it leads to improvement in the employability of persons with mental retardation. (5 pages)

Address:
National Rehabilitation Association
633 S. Washington Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 836-0850


Educating All Students in the Mainstream of Regular Education
Stainback, S., Stainback, W., & Forest, M. (Eds.). (1989).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Methods for integrating special and regular education classes are based on the premise that the educational norm for all students is to be educated in the mainstream of regular education. The authors note that students cannot be truly mainstreamed without the integration of teachers' resources and the systems of special and regular education. The book is divided into six main sections: (1) an overview of educational integration; (2) educational equality in practice; (3) strategies to promote merger; (4) educational practices to meet diverse student needs; (5) family and community support; and (6) final considerations. (304 pages, $34.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Effective Mainstreaming: Creating Inclusive Classrooms (2nd Ed.)
Salend S. J. (1994).
New York: Macmillan.

Intended for use by educators in teaching mainstreaming, this text provides readers with numerous strategies for creating inclusive classrooms for all students. Utilizing a crosscultural orientation, the text establishes an effective mainstreaming model. A new chapter in this revised edition is devoted to modifying classroom behavior and the classroom environment. Also new to this edition is an introductory chapter that reviews current legislation and litigation concerning persons with disabilities. (618 pages, call for institution rates)

Address:
Simon and Schuster
200 Old Tappan Road
Old Tappan, NJ 07675
(800) 223-2348
(800) 223-2336 for orders


The Exceptional Student in the Regular Classroom (5th Ed.)
Gearheart B. R., Weishahn, M. W., & Gearheart, C. J. (1992).
New York: Macmillan.

This book is designed for the preservice and inservice education of teachers who will be or are now teaching students with disabilities and students who are gifted and talented in regular classrooms. The first four chapters concentrate on information that is applicable for all exceptionalities such as legislation and effective instruction, while the remaining chapters examine eight specific exceptionalities individually. New features included are discussions on collaborative consultation and teacher assistance teams; how to handle students with health impairments, including students afflicted with HIV virus and students with behavioral disorders; and needs of the adolescent student. (475 pages, $42.00)

Address:
Simon and Schuster
200 Old Tappan Road
Old Tappan, NJ 07675
(800) 223-2348
(800) 223-2336 for orders


A Guide for Educating Mainstreamed Students (4th Ed.)
Mann, P. H., Suiter, P. A., & McClung, R. M. (1992).
Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

A step-by-step approach for organizing and managing a school's special education program is provided in this guide. It supplies readers with current developments in learning theory, educational technology, and instructional alternatives. Included in the guide are practical tips, procedures, checklists, and worksheets. The twelve chapters address the following topics: (1) Disorders of Learning and Behavior; (2) Theoretical Foundations; (3) Neurobiology of Learning; (4) Behavior Management; (5) Assessment: Rationale and Management; (6) Assessment Devices and Procedures; (7) Organization and Management for Instruction; (8) Language Development; (9) Language Arts: Reading, Spelling, and Written Language Expression; (10) Gross Motor-Body Image and Fine Motor Handwriting; (11) Mathematics and Arithmetic; and (12) Science, Social Studies, Study Skills, and Vocational Education. (634 pages, $34.95)

Address:
Allyn and Bacon
A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
160 Gould Street
Needham Heights, MA 02194-2310
(800) 852-8024


Helping Students Succeed in the Regular Classroom: A Guide for Developing Intervention Assistance Programs
Zins, J. E., Curtis, M. J., Graden, J. L., & Ponti, C. R. (1988).
San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

School psychologists, guidance counselors, and other special services professionals can develop programs that allow teachers to help students with special needs in the regular classroom in order to avoid the costly and often ineffective process of placing those students in special education classes. Through intervention assistance programs, school psychologists, guidance counselors, and social workers consult with teachers to help students with mild learning or behavior problems function effectively in regular classrooms. (273 pages, $26.95)

Address:
Jossey-Bass Inc., Publishers
350 Sansome Street
San Francisco, CA 94104-1310
(415) 433-1740


Integrating Deaf Students into Technical Classes. School Shop, 47(7)
Skobjak, B. L., Till, R. J., & Raco, T. G. (1988, February).
Ann Arbor, Ml: Prakken Publications.

This article provides insight for vocational/technical educators on how they can provide access in their classes for students who are deaf, as well as what educators should know about deafness. In addition, the article dispels many myths associated with deafness. The authors submit that utilizing a combination of communication and instructional strategies and further knowing students' characteristics contributes to the success of an accessible vocational/technical program for students who are deaf. (2 pages)

Address:
Prakken Publications, Inc.
P.O. Box 8623
Ann Arbor, Ml 48107
(313) 769-1211


Making Sense of Ability Grouping. Instructor, 102(9)
Hereford, N. (1993 May/June).
New York: Scholastic, Inc.

Grouping students by ability is one of the most common and controversial practices in education. This article discusses the challenge and methods of utilizing ability grouping in ways that will benefit all students. The author cites research conducted by Slavin which recommends the following ways to effectively use ability grouping in classrooms: (1) group students for only one or two subjects, with students remaining in heterogeneous classrooms for most of the day; (2) assign students to groups based on their demonstrated needs and abilities, not on IQ or previous performance; (3) group students for instruction only when It will help them learn new material; (4) use ability grouping to teach specific skills; (5) when grouping students, vary the level and pace of instruction to meet students' levels of readiness and understanding; and (6) reassess grouping assignments frequently. These techniques are offered to all educators to make sure ability grouping is properly being used to benefit all students in their classroom. (3 pages)

Address:
Scholastic, Inc.
411 Lafayette
4th Floor
New York NY 20003
(212) 505-4900


The McGill Action Planning System (MAPS): A Strategy for Building the Vision. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 14(3)
Vandercook, T., York, J., & Forest, M. (1989).
Seattle, WA: The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps.

The McGill Action Planning System (MAPS) is a planning process that places primary emphasis on the integral involvement of learners with disabilities in the school community. This article provides readers with a detailed description of the MAPS process, including the structure used, content covered, and the underlying assumptions of the process. The MAPS process is one that capitalizes on utilizing nondisabled classmates, family members, and educational personnel in the planning of integrating students with disabilities into regular school life. An example of the MAPS process planning for an elementary student with severe disabilities is given. In addition, the article explains modifications to the given example for secondary age students. A section of the article details how the MAPS process complements the IEP process in at least two ways. (11 pages)

Address:
The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
29 W. Susquehanna Avenue, Suite 210
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 828-8274


The Postsecondary Student with Learning Disabilities: Issues in Identification and Integration Manual
Colorado Community College Consortium for the Learning Disabled Project. (1988).
Littleton, CO: Author.

The Colorado Community College Consortium for the Learning Disabled Project has published this manual for use in a staff development/personnel preparation course. The manual contains the definition and characteristics of a learning disability; local, state, and federal laws; socialization, emotional, and behavioral needs; implications of a learning disability on adult life; metacognitive strategies; and analysis and adaptation of instructional methods and materials.

The manual provides a list of required readings, approximate costs, participant objectives, a course outline, evaluation techniques, and sample handout and overhead materials. The course requires 30 contact hours and has been designed to be covered in ten, three-hour sessions. (500 pages; $60.00; due to a limited quantity, orders will be filled on a first-come-first-serve basis)

Address:
PST Educational Consultants
8241 W. Walker Drive
Littleton, CO 80123
(303) 932-0181


Support Networks for Inclusive Schooling: Interdependent Integrated Education
Stainback, W., & Stainback, S. (Eds.). (1990).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

Developing each student's talents and gifts to his or her fullest capability and empowering students to help others is the primary focus of this book. The book was written for administrators, educators, parents, students, and interested citizens to be used as a tool in the development of schools into inclusive communities. It is divided into three main sections: (1) inclusive schooling and support networks, (2) classroom-focused support options, and (3) the development of caring and supportive schools and communities. These sections detail strategies for implementing inclusive education, and how classrooms can teach children to respect one another and carry that respect over into the community. (288 pages, $24.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Teaching Social Skills to Hearing-Impaired Students
Schloss, P. J., & Smith, M. A. (1990).
Washington, DC: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf.

This book provides teachers and parents with a comprehensive, clearly presented, hands-on program to develop social skills in hearing-impaired children and young adults. This book will prove particularly valuable for mainstreamed students. Social competence is essential for those taking an active part in society. (203 pages; $21.95, plus $3.00 postage and handling)

Address:
Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf
Publications Sales Department
3417 Volta Place, NW
Washington, DC 20007-2778
(202) 337-5220 TDD or Voice


Transition from School to Work: The Alternative Cooperative Education Handbook
Lehmann, J. P., Starck, T. J., & Carlson, L. G. (1991).
Fort Collins: Colorado State University, School of Occupational and Educational Studies.

The goal of Colorado's Alternative Cooperative Education (ACE) Program is to enhance the educational opportunities for special needs youth, maximize their abilities to live independently, and reduce their risk of dropping out. It is flexible and designed to serve both students with Individualized Education Plans and those that are economically disadvantaged. The program contains seven important elements: (1) vocational assessment, (2) educational planning process, (3) career and guidance advising, (4) occupational experiences, (5) transitional services, (6) curriculum, and (7) an advisory committee.

This manual, an extension of the Work Experience Resource Manual, provides information to individuals beginning or improving an ACE program. It describes the program history; the process used to design the manual; program components, curriculum, and resources; advice on applying for funding; and information on relevant legislation. A tool for evaluating program strengths and weaknesses is also provided. Appendices contain many useful forms, legislation abstracts, and articles. (218 pages, $25.00)

Address:
Colorado State University
School of Education
Education Building
Fort Collins, CO 80523
(303) 491-6316





PUBLICATIONS

Curriculum and Instruction


Alternative Uses of Ability Grouping: Can We Bring High-Quality Instruction to Low-Ability Classes?
Gamoran, A. (1992).
Madison, WI: Center on Organization and Restructuring of Schools.

Findings of a study that investigated whether or not ability grouping can be implemented more effectively are presented in this paper, with a focus on exploring possible instances of high-quality instruction in low-ability classes. Methodology involved observation, teacher questionnaires, and interviews of eighth- and ninth-grade English classes in 25 midwestern schools. The two schools that exhibited effective instruction in low-track classes were Catholic schools, which in general are characterized by an ethos of caring, academic rigor, and seriousness of purpose. Findings indicate that variability exists in the implementation of student grouping and that such differences are tied to student outcomes. Examples of effective uses of ability grouping for students in low-ranked classes in the two Catholic schools are presented. The two cases are characterized by: (1) high expectations by teachers; (2) extra exertion by teachers to foster extensive oral classroom discourse; and (3) no system for assigning weak or inexperienced teachers to lower tracks. A limitation of the study is that Catholic students tend to come from more economically advantaged backgrounds. (24 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 351 808, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Child Language Disability (Volume III)
Mogford-Bevan, K., & Sadler, J. (Eds.). (1993).
Bristol, PA: Multilingual Matters Ltd.

Hearing impairment, whether mild and transient or lifelong and severe, can potentially undermine a child's learning because successful communication is at the heart of the educational process. This book provides information that mainstream teachers and support teachers can utilize in adjusting classroom practice to the specific needs of hearing-impaired children. It is also for speech and language therapists involved in the management of hearing-impaired children in both mainstream and special provision. Topics discussed include practices and provisions for hearing impaired children, different types of hearing loss, implications of hearing impairment for social and language development, acoustics considerations for hearing-impaired children, educational management of hearing-impaired children in mainstream schools, and speech and language therapy support of hearing-impaired children in an integrated educational setting. A list of organizations that can offer specialist help and/or advice is included. (68 pages, $21.00)

Address:
Multilingual Matters Ltd.
1900 Frost Road, Suite 101
Bristol, PA 19007


Curriculum Adaptation for Inclusive Classrooms
Neary, T., Halvorsen, A., Kronberg, R., & Kelly, D. (1992, December).
Sacramento, CA: PEERS Project.

This manual on curriculum adaptation for inclusive classrooms was developed as a collaborative effort between the California Research Institute and the Systems Change Projects in California and Colorado. Information in the manual reflects information offered by practicing full-inclusion sites. The goal of the manual was to make this information accessible to parents, teachers, special support personnel, and administrators so they can support programs that are developing inclusive schools in their communities and states. The manual is divided into six main sections: (1) an introduction; (2) service delivery models for inclusive education; (3) building-level support and strategies; (4) classroom-based strategies; (5) student-specific strategies; and (6) closing. Three appendices include National Full Inclusion Site Network, PEERS Project Inclusive Education Guidelines, and Individualized Program Development Forms. (182 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 358 637, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


A Curriculum Development Process for Inclusive Classrooms. Focus on Exceptional Children, 25(4)
York, J., Doyle, M. B., & Kronberg, R. (1992, December).
Denver, CO: Love Publishing Company.

Both general and special education are at a critical crossroad for determining what schools should do for all students. This article discusses a curriculum design to be applied in inclusive school communities. The authors state that an inclusive school community is one in which all members of the community--adults and children belong. In an inclusive school community, all members can support one another and maximize individual potential. The authors suggest the following process of curriculum development for inclusive classrooms: (1) planning the transition; (2) taking the plunge . . . determining needs in context; (3) envisioning a desirable future; and (4) bringing it together and moving forward . . . one class at a time. The article concluded with a challenge for all educators and community members to break out of old paradigms and, in turn, provide the best teaching-learning experience possible for all students. (16 pages)

Address:
Love Publishing Company
Executive and Editorial Office
1777 S. Bellaire Street
Denver, CO 80222
(303) 757-2579


Integration/Inclusion Needs Assessment (Rev. Ed.)
Halvorsen, A. T., Smithey, L., Neary, T., & Gilbert, S. (1992).
Sacramento, CA: PEERS Project.

The PEERS (Providing Education for Everyone In Regular Schools) Project--a California project to integrate students with severe disabilities who were previously at special centers into services at regular school sites and students who were in special classes in regular schools into general education--developed this needs assessment instrument. The first section of the needs assessment is for use with local education agencies (LEAs) that have developed a written plan for integration/inclusion transitions. It is intended to help evaluate plan components in the following areas: least restrictive environment policy, student placement, physical plant availability and selection, accessibility criteria, staff assignments, administrative roles/ responsibilities, interagency and/or inclusion, and facilitation of peer interactions. Section two is designed to assist in identifying the history and goals of the LEA in regard to attitudes toward integration and inclusion; existing resources to support transitions; space concerns within accessible schools; personnel role changes; site preparation needs; and parent reactions to the integration/inclusion plan. The third section is intended for on-site review and covers environmental considerations, school climate, special education teacher integration, general education classroom environment, student integration, and the curricular and instructional model. (38 pages, ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 358 634, cost varies by document)

Available From:
ERIC Document Reproduction Service
Cincinnati Bell Information Systems Federal (DYNCORP/EDRS)
7420 Fullerton Road
Suite 110
Springfield, VA 22153-2852
(800) 443-3742


Practical Considerations in the Use of Technology to Facilitate the Inclusion of Students with Severe Disabilities. Technology and Disability, 3(2)
Carey, D. M., & Sale, P. (1994, May).
Stoneham, MA: Butterworth Heinemann.

For students with severe disabilities, inclusion in the regular classroom requires physical accommodation, curricular accommodation, and communication enhancements. This article reviews a study completed with 28 teachers of students with severe disabilities with the intent to assess the outcome of technology use by students with severe disabilities. The teachers reported student use of technology in the classroom and the barriers to effective use of technology. Barriers mentioned included complexity and lack of familiarity with technology, equipment breakdown, early abandonment, student interaction with others only at site of the technology, cost of specialty items, necessity of the student being located near power outlets or often needing battery changes, students using technology to interrupt or act out, and individual education programs lacking curricular objectives related to learning or using technology. The authors suggest some procedures for minimizing or overcoming barriers to technology use for students with severe disabilities. (10 pages)

Address:
Butterworth Heinemann
225 Wildwood Avenue
Woburn, MA 01801
(800) 366-2665


The Role of the Classroom Teacher as a Curriculum Leader. NASSP Bulletin, 76(547)
Haberman, M. (1992, November).
Reston, VA: National Association of Secondary School Principals.

Although teachers have little voice in textbook selection or standardized test content, they still retain the most powerful influence on students' learning and can serve as curriculum leaders. The author of this article examined the role of the classroom teacher as this curriculum leader. Many past analyses of the classroom teacher's role in curriculum development have made the following mistakes: (1) defining curriculum too broadly, (2) defining curriculum development as an authoritarian administrative process, (3) claiming curriculum development to be a local activity without support, (4) defining classroom teachers as "merely" implementers, (5) defining the teacher as a crusader, and (6) defining the teacher as someone in need of motivation rather than opportunity. The author feels that classroom teachers need to be viewed as part of the solution, not as part of the problem. It was proposed that classroom teachers, as curriculum leaders, focus on three areas: (1) detracking, (2) real teaching, and (3) making Americans. (9 pages)

Address:
National Association of Secondary School Principals
1904 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091
(703) 860-0200


Successful Mainstreaming: Proven Ways to Detect and Correct Special Needs
Choate, J. S. (Ed.). (1993).
Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

This book addresses the diverse learning and behavior needs of special students and offers practical suggestions for correcting problems in structuring, managing, and enhancing the instruction of these students. A handy and comprehensive resource guide on mainstreaming, it includes the detection of 101 special needs and more than 1,000 corrective strategies. It is divided into three major parts, which provide a positive overview and understanding of the detection and correction process. Ultimately, the book is intended to increase the achievement of special needs students in both regular and special education classrooms. (478 pages, $39.95)

Address:
Allyn and Bacon
A Division of Simon & Schuster, Inc.
Department 894
160 Gould Street
Needham Heights, MA 02194-2310
(800) 852-8024





PUBLICATIONS

Comprehensive Support Services


The Comprehensive Local School: Regular Education for All Students with Disabilities
Sailor, W., Anderson, J. L., Halvorsen, A. T., Doering, K., Filler, J., & Goetz, L. (1989).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

The comprehensive local school (CLS) model is based on the belief that no student is so severely disabled that a free, appropriate public education cannot be delivered at the local school--the same school the child would have attended if he or she had no disabilities. This book describes the five phases of this model that help promote the development of unified, comprehensive educational delivery that is consistent with federal policies and extends benefits from preschool through high school and beyond for students with disabilities. The five phases of the CLS model are as follows: (1) mainstreaming young children with disabilities; (2) integrated educational services in the elementary school years; (3) community intensive instruction in the intermediate and middle school years; (4) transition from school to work and community service; and (5) the postschool years: integrated support work and community living. (288 pages, $33.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
Order Department
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 437-8539


Creating Individual Supports for People with Developmental Disabilities: A Mandate for Change at Many Levels
Bradley, V. J., Ashbaugh, J. W., & Blaney, B. C. (Eds.). (1994).
Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

The vision of inclusion must move beyond rhetoric and become a reality for people with disabilities in the United States. This book is for policymakers, systems administrators, program developers, service coordinators and providers, social workers, advocates, consumers, and others committed to interdependence and inclusion in the community of all people with disabilities. It attempts to capture the major steps necessary to bring about systemic changes, including the continuing reconfiguration and reshaping of the legal and regulatory superstructure that governs the provision of services as well as the development of new service delivery and administrative strategies to enable individuals with disabilities to thrive as active members of their communities. It offers insights into designing community support at the individual, agency, local, state, and regional levels; and presents in-depth case studies on successful transformations across the nation. (532 pages, $35.00)

Address:
Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 10624
Baltimore, MD 21285-0624
(410) 337-9580
(800) 638-3775
Fax: (410) 337-8539


Employment of Persons with Dual Sensory Impairments: Strategies for Inclusion. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 16(3)
Goetz, L., Lee, M., Johnston, S., & Gaylord-Ross, R. (1991).
Seattle, WA: The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps.

Case study examples of persons with dual sensory impairments and other multiple disabilities who have been involved in an integrated community employment program are discussed in this article. The authors provide strategies they feel are critical to ensure facilitated, integrated work for persons with dual sensory impairments: (1) heterogeneous group placements, (2) job restructuring, (3) volunteerism, (4) natural supports, (5) the facilitation of social and communication interactions, and (6) future directions. (9 pages)

Address:
The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
29 W. Susquehanna Avenue, Suite 210
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 828-8274


Parent Primer: Secondary Programs for Students with Severe Disabilities
Slovic, R., Ferguson, P., Lynch, B., & Wilcox, B. (1988).
Eugene, OR: Parents' Graduation Alliance.

This publication is for parents who wish to be involved in their adolescent's transition program. It focuses on components of quality high school programs, including integration, age-appropriate programming, community-based curriculum, futures orientation, comprehensive coverage of adult life issues, opportunities for parent involvement, and documented effectiveness. The importance of parent involvement during the IEP process, transition planning, and monitoring and advocacy is also emphasized. ($5.00)

Address:
Roz Slovic
Specialized Training Program, 1235
University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403-1235
(503) 346-5311


The School Counselor and Comprehensive Programs for Work-Bound Youth
Jepsen, D., et al (Herr, E. L., Ed.). (1992, November).
Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

The commitment of the American Counseling Association is to the career development of all children and young adults--including the noncollege-bound. This paper presents comprehensive programs that address the career and occupational needs of work-bound students. In addition, it discusses the multiple roles of school counselors in implementing effective, comprehensive programs. The American Counseling Association suggests that career counseling be part of five needed programs combining vocational education with traditional academics: (1) cooperative education, (2) apprenticeships, (3) internships, (4) pre-employment training, and (5) youth-operated enterprises. (53 pages, no charge)

Address:
American Counseling Association
801 N. Fairfax Street, Suite 310
Alexandria, VA 22314
(800) 306-4722


Vocational Counseling for Special Populations
Schiro-Geist, C. (Ed.). (1990).
Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas Publisher.

This book is meant to enhance and clarify vocational issues for vocational counselors of nontraditional clients. Nontraditional clients include the following special populations groups: (1) displaced homemakers, (2) veterans, (3) women in competitive market, (4) older workers, (5) persons with disabilities, and (6) disadvantaged workers. Each chapter ends with review questions and references. Five case histories of clients with special needs are presented at the end of Chapter 5. The last chapter on supported employment (Chapter 7) is an important one for counselors in the 1990s because supported employment will often be the vocational outcome for special populations, especially for individuals with severe disabilities. (161 pages; $32.95, plus shipping and handling)

Address:
Charles C. Thomas Publisher
2600 S. First Street
Springfield, IL 62794-9265
(217) 789-8980





NEWSLETTERS

ASCD Update
Published quarterly, this newsletter presents information on curriculum development, conferences, research, and ASCD activities. In addition, the ASCD Curriculum Update is published as a supplement to ASCD Update. It presents research findings, exemplary programs, and available resources in a specific curriculum area. (Included in ASCD membership)

Contact:
John O Neil, Editor
ASCD Update
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD)
1250 N. Pitt Street
Alexandria, VA 22314-1403
(703) 549-9110


Inclusion Times for Children and Youth with Disabilities
This newsletter focuses on serving children and youth with disabilities in regular education and other inclusive learning environments. The intent of this newsletter is to provide readers with nonbiased and meaningful information concerning policy issues, model programs, teaming/collaboration, networking, briefings of research literature, legal and regulatory developments, inclusion/school restructuring, events/conferences, resources, and community and state initiatives. ($29.95/year, $49.95/two-year subscription)

Contact:
Daniel D. Sage, Editor
Inclusion Times for Children and Youth with Disabilities
National Professional Resources, Inc.
25 S. Regent Street
Port Chester, NY 10573
(914) 937-8879
(800) 453-7461
Fax: (914) 937-9327


Inclusive Education Programs
This newsletter is dedicated to covering legal issues in educating children with disabilities in regular education environments. Published monthly, the newsletter provides readers with practical how-to advice on developing cost-effective, inclusive education programs for children with disabilities; real-life examples of successful and not-so-successful efforts to teach students with disabilities in regular education settings; concise summaries of the most recent judicial case law on full inclusion, and expert, unbiased interpretation and advice as to each decision's impact on your school; and available resources to assist you in designing inclusive programs. ($115.00/year, plus $5.00 shipping and handling if not prepaid)

Contact:
Karen K. Diamond, Managing Editor
Inclusive Education Programs
LRP Publications
Department 430
747 Dresher Road
P.O. Box 980
Horsham, PA 19044-0980
(800) 341-7874
Fax: (215) 784-9639


Innovations: School Inclusion Project
The focus of this newsletter is the inclusion (mainstreaming) of students (K-12) with disabilities into regular classrooms. Articles provide information about innovative programs and practices and include topics such as curriculum modification and adaptation, student involvement, intracollaboration among teachers and support personnel, and other activities concerning the School Inclusion Project in New Hampshire. The newsletter also serves as a forum for teachers to share suggestions and ideas regarding classroom problems and solutions. (no charge)

Contact:
Innovations: School Inclusion Project
University of New Hampshire
Institute on Disability
Concord Center
10 Ferry Street, Unit #14
Concord, NH 03301
(603) 228-2084


Newsnotes
Published periodically, this newsletter contains articles about education advocacy, including an update on legislative and federal agency activities, noteworthy advocacy efforts, and resources. Each issue emphasizes education topics on low-income students and parents and covers key areas of concern, including bilingual/bicultural education, disciplinary action, educational reform, racial special education, discrimination, and vocational education. (no charge)

Contact:
Newsnotes
Center for Law and Education
197 Friend Street
9th Floor
Boston, MA 02114
(617) 371-1166


OUTCOMES
OUTCOMES is published twice a year by the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO), a cooperative program of the University of Minnesota Institute on Community Integration, and the National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE). It contains news and information on outcomes for students with disabilities and the development of a system of indicators with which to monitor those outcomes. (no charge)

Contact:
OUTCOMES
National Center on Educational Outcomes
University of Minnesota
350 Elliott Hall
75 E. River Road
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 626-1530


Population Today
Population Today is published 11 times a year by the Population Reference Bureau. Articles cover the latest objective demographic information from around the world. Listed are additional demographic resources published by the Population Reference Bureau, as well as publications from other organizations. ($45.00/year for individual members, $30.00/year for educators)

Contact:
Population Today
Population Reference Bureau, Inc.
1875 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Suite 520
Washington, DC 20009-5728
(202) 483-1100
Fax: (202) 328-3937





JOURNALS

America's Agenda: Schools for the 21st Century
This journal is copublished three times a year by Scholastic Inc. and the National Alliance of Business. The partnership of these two organizations formed a mutual goal for quality solutions to our nation's education challenges. The intent of the journal is to assist policymakers in business, government, and education to restructure the nation's schools. ($18.00/year)

Contact:
America's Agenda: Schools for the 21st Century
Scholastic Inc.
411 Lafayette
4th Floor
New York, NY 10012
(800) 631-1586


Exceptional Children
Published six times a year, this research journal contains research studies on the education and development of children and youth who have disabilities and children who are gifted, articles by authorities in the field of special education, reviews of professional books and films, and discussions of current issues and problems. Members of the Council for Exceptional Children receive this journal as part of their membership fee. ($45.00/year, $8.50/single copy)

Contact:
Exceptional Children
Council for Exceptional Children
1920 Association Drive
Department K 2
Reston, VA 22091-1589
(703) 620-3660


Focus on Exceptional Children
Published nine times a year, this journal is designed for teachers, special educators, curriculum specialists, administrators, and those concerned with the education of children with special needs. Each issue focuses in-depth on a single topic such as the role of social interaction in developing thinking skills, teacher assistance teams, suspension and expulsion, the regular education initiative, memory training, and other timely issues. ($27.00/year)

Contact:
Focus on Exceptional Children
Love Publishing Company
1777 S. Bellaire Street
Denver, CO 80222
(303) 757-2579


Journal for Vocational Special Needs Education
Published three times a year (January, May, and October) by the National Association of Vocational Education Special Needs Personnel (NAVESNP), this journal's audience includes vocational and special educators concerned with the vocational education of students with special needs and state departments of vocational education and special education. It contains articles pertaining to vocational preparation for students with special needs, including teacher preparation, program design, student characteristics, materials and methods modification, community resource development, prevocational experiences, and cooperative work arrangements. (included in NAVESNP membership; $18.00/library, $6.50/single copy)

Contact:
Jay Rojewski, Editor
Journal for Vocational Special Needs Education
Department of Vocational Education
University of Georgia
624 Aderhold Hall
Athens, GA 30602


Journal of Career Assessment
Journal of Career Assessment is published quarterly by Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc. The purpose of this journal is to provide methodologically sound, empirically based studies focusing on the process and techniques by which counselors and others gain understanding of the individual faced with the necessity of making informed career decisions. Manuscripts describing innovative career assessment strategies, developments in instrumentation, and validation of theoretical constructs are featured. Other topics addressed in the journal include relationships among existing instruments, career assessment procedures, relationships between assessment and career counseling/development, and review articles of career assessment strategies and techniques. ($40.00/year individual prepaid subscription)

Contact:
Journal of Career Assessment
Psychological Assessment Resources, Inc.
P.O. Box 998
Odessa, FL 33556
(800) 331-TEST


Journal of Child and Family Studies
This journal focuses on identifying, treating, and rehabilitating children and adolescents with emotional disorders, and presents family studies from a mental health perspective. This international quarterly journal is directed toward scholars, researchers, and practitioners, and covers such topics as child abuse and neglect, respite care, foster care, financing mental health care, and family stress. The format includes articles, book and media reviews, commentaries, and professional announcements. ($45.00/annually)

Contact:
Journal of Child and Family Studies
Department of Psychiatry
Medical College of Virginia
P.O. Box 489
Richmond, VA 23298
(804) 786-0000


Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Reclaiming Children and Youth
The Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems, published quarterly, is an interdisciplinary journal with a mission of networking individuals involved in reclaiming children and youth. Each issue highlights a specific challenge in working with youth at-risk. The journal also provides readers with strategies for dealing with angry, aggressive behaviors found in all settings; access to research completed on applicable issues including childhood depression, youth violence, school reform, and family renewal; alternative models for creating environments where all children can learn and grow; and an international network of professionals. ($35.00/year individual subscription)

Contact:
Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Reclaiming Children and Youth
National Educational Service
1610 W. Third Street
P.O. Box 55
Bloomington, IN 47402
(812) 336-7700
(800) 733-6786
Fax: (812) 336-7790


The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
This journal is published quarterly by The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps. Articles report on original research, reviews, position papers, assessment methods, intervention strategies, and descriptions of service delivery model programs. ($85.00/year subscription)

Contact:
The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
The Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps
29 W. Susquehanna Avenue, Suite 210
Baltimore, MD 21204
(410) 828-8274


Perspectives in Education and Deafness
This journal is published bimonthly throughout the school year. Most articles are contributed by teachers or other school personnel. The journal recognizes parents as the first and most influential teacher of their children. Articles are experience-based in support of family communication, emotional growth, and the development of every child to his or her highest potential. The journal addresses issues such as setting up and maintaining viable mainstream programs; teaching love of language and the joy of reading; finding practical, dynamic approaches to the teaching of math and science; helping families create a supportive learning environment for deaf toddlers; and guiding teenagers to self-esteem through genuine academic and social achievement. In addition, articles include successful teaching strategies, current issues in deafness, and creative ideas for family and community activities. ($15.00/year in the U.S., $21.00/year in Canada and other foreign countries)

Contact:
Perspectives in Education and Deafness
Pre-College Programs
Gallaudet University
800 Florida Avenue, NE
Washington, DC 20002





EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION CENTERS/AGENCIES/ORGANIZATIONS

Appalachia Educational Laboratory
This lab is one of ten regional educational laboratories established by the Office of Educational Research and Improvement, U.S. Department of Education, to focus on school improvement throughout the United States. The labs conduct applied research, development, and technical assistance for educators, parents, and decisionmakers. The Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) serves as the regional educational lab for Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. To address the goals toward the improvement of professional quality, curriculum and instruction, community support, and equal educational access for all students, AEL operates the following eight projects: (1) Classroom Instruction program (teachers), (2) School Governance and Administration program (school administrators and school board members), (3) Colleges and Schools program (colleges for teacher education), (4) State Policy program (policymakers), (5) Information Services program (direct services to educators), (6) Community Liaison to Urban Education program (underrepresented groups), (7) Rural, Small Schools program (rural citizens and educators), and (8) Rural Excel program (with state education agencies and local education agencies personnel).

Under the Community Liaison to Urban Education program, the concerns, interests, and special needs of underrepresented groups are assessed and addressed in AEL's program and activities. The Rural, Small Schools program provides information about promising current practices and seeks to set up technology-based networks of local schools with college libraries. The Rural Excel program works with local and state educators to develop, test, and disseminate appropriate new learning materials and processes for rural schools. AEL also operates the ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools. AEL publishes The Link newsletter. A publications catalog is available upon request.

Contact:
Appalachia Educational Laboratory
1031 Quarrier Street
P.O. Box 1348
Charleston, WV 25325-1348
(304) 347-0400 locally
(800) 344-0400 in WV
(800) 624-9120 outside WV
Fax: (304) 347-0487


The Arc
The Arc (formerly the Association for Retarded Citizens) is a national membership organization committed to securing for all people with mental retardation the opportunity to choose and realize their goals of where and how they learn, live, work, and play. It is committed to reducing the incidence and limiting the consequence of mental retardation through education; research; advocacy; and the support of family, friends, and community.

Some of The Arc's current activities include an annual nationwide television, radio, and print media campaign to educate the public about people with mental retardation; a national job placement service to assist workers with mental retardation to obtain and retain jobs in competitive employment; and research on applying technologies in new ways to help children and adults with mental retardation to achieve greater independence. In addition, The Arc works through education in cooperation with other national groups to promote prevention programs. Citizen advocacy and self-advocacy programs, recreational activities, public education efforts, and employment programs also are available through many local chapters. More than 100 publications dealing with research, employment, prevention, and parenting issues are available through The Arc. Members receive The Arc Today, the Association's national newspaper, six times a year.

Contact:
The Arc
National Headquarters
500 E. Border Street, Suite 300
Arlington, TX 76010
(817) 261 -6003
Fax: (817) 277-3491


Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) is the largest professional leadership organization in education. The 112,000 members form a broad cross section of instructional leaders in all 50 states and several other countries. A third of ASCD's members are principals and the rest are equally divided among other leadership roles, including curriculum directors, superintendents, teachers and professors. ASCD was founded in 1943 and continues to seek to improve education by increasing leaders' knowledge and skills in the areas of curriculum development, supervision, and instruction through publications, conferences, institutes, research, and with ASCD's affiliate units. ASCD supports a balanced curriculum and instruction that enables all students in a diverse society to learn successfully.

Contact:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
1250 N. Pitt Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 549-9110


Center for Success in Learning
The Center for Success in Learning (CSL) is a nonprofit resource center for teachers of slower learners (general IQ 70-89) who do not learn typically or easily. The purpose of the CSL is to ensure that slower learners and other students at risk have the opportunities to develop educational, social, and independent living skills so they are prepared to participate in society as contributing, self-sufficient citizens. CSL's goal is to provide teachers, instructional leaders, and parents with "what works"--the latest in research and application for slower learners and other students at risk through conferences, workshop training, state and national conferences, and educational resources. Information packets, articles, and products are available for educators and parents.

Contact:
Center for Success in Learning
1002 N. Central, Suite 116
Richardson, TX 75080
(214) 407-9277
Fax: (214) 407-9852


Closing the Gap
Closing the Gap is an internationally recognized source for information on the use of microcomputer-related technology by and for exceptional individuals. It is committed to providing the most up-to-date information on commercially available hardware and software products that can enable individuals with disabilities access to the microcomputer--and to the opportunities for education and independent living that it offers. Closing the Gap has developed three primary information delivery methods: (1) a bimonthly newspaper, (2) training and consultation services, and (3) an annual international conference. Their annual publication, Closing the Gap Resource Directory, contains a comprehensive listing of commercially available hardware and software products identified as appropriate for special education and rehabilitation.

Contact:
Closing the Gap
526 Main Street
P.O. Box 68
Henderson, MN 56044
(612) 248-3294
Fax: (612) 248-3810


Council for Exceptional Children
The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) is an organization dedicated to improving the quality of education for all exceptional children who are disabled and gifted. Special divisions within the organization focus on the education of gifted, mentally retarded, learning disabled, visually impaired, communication impaired, physically disabled, and behavior disordered students. Other divisions serve the interests of early childhood special educators; administrators; teacher educators; students; diagnosticians; and those especially interested in technology, career education, and research.

CEC's commitment encompasses four major priority areas: (1) advancing the education of exceptional persons by improving access to special education for underserved or inappropriately served populations and by extending special education to children who could benefit from, but are not now considered entitled to such services; (2) improving the conditions under which professionals work with exceptional persons through the establishment of professional standards of practice and a code of ethics for all professionals involved in the education of exceptional persons; (3) improving the quality of instruction provided to exceptional persons by supporting the development and dissemination of new knowledge, technology, methodology, curriculum, and materials on a worldwide basis; and (4) advancing the CEC by enhancing communication between the organization and its individual members, units, and other organizations involved with exceptional persons. CEC is the host organization for several projects important to the education field, including the ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children and the National Clearinghouse for Professions in Special Education.

Contact:
Council for Exceptional Children
1920 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091-1589
(703) 620-3660
Fax: (703) 264-9494


Council of Chief State School Officers
Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) is a nationwide, nonprofit organization of the 57 public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in every state, five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Department of Defense Dependents' Schools. CCSSO seeks its members' consensus on major education issues and expresses their views to civic and professional organizations, federal agencies, Congress, and the public.

The Council maintains a Resource Center on Educational Equity which provides services designed to achieve equity in education for minorities, women and girls, and for students who are disabled, limited English proficient (LEP), and economically disadvantaged. CCSSO's staff provides technical assistance in policy formulation, develops programs and materials, gives technical assistance in workshop planning and other services needed by state education agencies, holds working conferences, monitors civil rights issues, and trains local on-site trainers to increase the dimensions of this work. CCSSO also publishes a quarterly newsletter, CONCERNS.

CCSSO is responsible for managing and staffing a variety of leadership initiatives to provide better educational services to children and youth at risk of school failure. It conducts projects on topics such as dropout prevention, improving educational services to LEP students, increasing the participation of female and minority students in mathematics and social studies, transition programs for disabled youth, school-sanctioned community service, educational equity for juvenile female offenders, and AIDS education.

Contact:
Council of Chief State School Officers
One Massachusetts Avenue, NW
Suite 700
Washington, DC 20001-1431
(202) 408-5505
Fax: (202) 393-1228


ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
The ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education, operated by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), gathers and disseminates educational information on all disabilities and the gifted across all age levels. The areas included in its scope concern all aspects of the education and development of people who are disabled and gifted, including prevention, identification and assessment, intervention, and enrichment, both in special settings and within the mainstream. The Clearinghouse abstracts and indexes the special education literature included in the computerized ERIC database and its monthly print indexes, Resources in Education (RIE) and Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE). Services include workshops and technical assistance; computer searches of the ERIC and Exceptional Child Education Resources (ECER) databases; and analyses of current trends and issues.

Contact:
Shelia Mingo, Director
ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
Council for Exceptional Children
1920 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091-1589
(703) 620-3660


ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children
The ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children, operated by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), gathers and disseminates educational information on all disabilities and the gifted across all age levels. The areas included in its scope concern all aspects of the education and development of people who are disabled and gifted, including prevention, identification and assessment, intervention, and enrichment, both in special settings and within the mainstream. The Clearinghouse abstracts and indexes the special education literature included in the computerized ERIC database and its monthly print indexes, Resources in Education (RIE) and Current Index to Journals in Education (CIJE). Services include workshops and technical assistance; computer searches of the ERIC and Exceptional Child Education Resources (ECER) databases; and analyses of current trends and issues.

Contact:
ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children
Council for Exceptional Children
1920 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091-1589
(703) 620-3660


GED Testing Service
For adults who did not complete high school, the GED tests (tests of General Educational Development) provide an opportunity to earn a high school credential. Sponsored by the American Council on Education, the GED program enables individuals to demonstrate that they have acquired a level of learning comparable to that of high school graduates. The service includes special accommodations for candidates with specific disabling conditions, including learning disabilities, with appropriate documentation. The Testing Service provides information about special testing for people with disabilities to interested individuals who would like to take the GED tests and to those people who are helping prepare individuals for the GED tests.

Contact:
GED Testing Service
American Council on Education
One DuPont Circle, NW, Suite 250
Washington, DC 20036-1163
(202) 939-9490
(800) 626-9433
Fax: (202) 775-8578


HEATH Resource Center
The HEATH Resource Center operates the national clearinghouse on postsecondary education for individuals with disabilities. The Center serves as an information exchange about educational support services, policies, procedures, adaptations, and opportunities on American campuses, vocational-technical schools, transition training and adult education programs, independent living centers, and other training entities which serve youth and adults beyond high school. The Center gathers and disseminates this information so that people with disabilities can develop their full potential through postsecondary education and training if they choose to do so. The Center provides technical assistance to colleges, universities, and postsecondary programs to help them include students with disabilities. HEATH maintains a toll-free number, provides single copies of materials free of charge in print or through alternative media, and encourages duplication and dissemination of its resources. HEATH disseminates the Information from HEATH newsletter, which is also free of charge. A list of publications is available upon request.

Contact:
HEATH Resource Center
American Council on Education
One Dupont Circle, Suite 800
Washington, DC 20036-1193
(202) 939-9320 Voice or TDD, TT (Typed Text)
(800) 594-3284 Voice or TDD


National Center on Educational Outcomes
The mission of the National Center on Educational Outcomes (NCEO) is to provide national leadership in the identification of educational outcomes for students with disabilities and in the development of a system of indicators with which to monitor those outcomes. NCEO is working with national policy-making groups, state departments of education, and other groups and individuals to promote national discussion of educational goals and indicators of educational outcomes that include students with disabilities. They publish a biannual newsletter and a variety of reports.

Contact:
James Ysseldyke, Director
Martha Thurlow, Assistant Director
National Center on Educational Outcomes
University of Minnesota
350 Elliott Hall
75 E. River Road
Minneapolis, MN 55455
(612) 626-1530
(612) 624-4848 TDD
SpecialNet: MN.OUTCOM
Fax: (612) 624-0879


National Federation of the Blind
National Federation of the Blind (NFB) is a consumer group which can answer questions about blindness and refer people to appropriate resources or adapted equipment. The ultimate purpose of the NFB is the complete integration of the blind into society on a basis of equality. This objective involves the removal of legal, economic, and social discriminations; the education of the public to new concepts concerning blindness; and the achievement by all blind people of the right to exercise to the fullest their individual talents and capacities. NFB publishes The Braille Monitor, a monthly publication devoted to news and discussion of issues important to blind people. It Is produced in print, Braille, on record, and on cassettes and is available without cost to the blind and the sighted alike upon request.

Contact:
Marc Maurer, President
National Federation of the Blind
1800 Johnson Street
Baltimore, MD 21230
(410) 659-9314


National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities (NICHCY) operates as a national clearinghouse to provide free information to assist parents, educators, caregivers, advocates, and others to improve the lives of children and youth with disabilities and to assist them in becoming participating members of the community. NICHCY collects and shares information and ideas that are helpful to children and youth with disabilities and the people who care for and about them. NICHCY answers questions, links people with others who share common concerns, provides technical assistance, publishes information products, and uses visual media to inform. Essentially, NICHCY helps information flow between the people who have it and those who need it. Publications on current issues available at no charge from NICHCY include three News Digests per year, one Transition Summary per year, briefing papers, fact sheets, and state resource sheets. A list of free publications is available upon request.

Contact:
Susan Elting, Director
National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
P.O. Box 1492
Washington, DC 20013-1492
(703) 893-6061 (Local)
(703) 893-8614 (TDD)
(800) 999-5599 (voice mail after office hours)
Fax: (703) 893-1741


National Rehabilitation Information Center
National Rehabilitation Information Center (NARIC) provides reference, research, and referral services concerning disability and rehabilitation issues. NARIC also provides document delivery and custom database searches of REHABDATA, their database, and other databases available through the Center, and maintains an extensive research collection. It publishes the NARIC Quarterly: A Newsletter of Disability and Rehabilitation Research and Resources. In addition, other publications which accommodate a broad range of information seekers--from the practical to the technical--are made available. NARIC's staff encourages telephone or mail requests, as well as walk-in visits to access resources in NARIC's extensive library.

Contact:
Mark X. Odum, Director
National Rehabilitation Information Center
8455 Colesville Road, Suite 935
Silver Spring, MD 20910-3319
(301) 588-9284 TDD/Voice
(800) 446-2742
Fax: (301) 587-1967


National Technical Institute for the Deaf
National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), one of the Rochester Institute of Technology's (RIT's) nine colleges, is the world's largest technological college for deaf students. Created by Congress and funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Education, NTID represents the world's first effort to educate large numbers of deaf students within a college campus planned principally for hearing students. In addition to the academic programs based within NTID, RIT's deaf students also benefit from nearly 200 other technical and professional courses of study offered by RIT's other eight colleges. NTID offers deaf students the opportunity to go to college in a hearing environment and thus makes their transition to a hearing society easier and more effective.

Contact:
William Castle, Director
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Rochester Institute of Technology
Lyndon Baines Johnson Building
52 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5604
(716) 475-6400 Voice/TDD


Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights
Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights (PACER), a coalition of twenty Minnesota disability organizations, is a center of parents helping parents. Staffed primarily by parents of children with disabilities, or by persons with disabilities themselves, PACER offers information about laws, procedures, and parents' rights and responsibilities. PACER works with parents of children and young persons with all disabilities--physical, mental, learning, and emotional. PACER's programs help parents become informed and effective representatives for their children in educational, vocational and other decision-making settings. PACER offers transition workshops for parents of secondary school students with disabilities as well as transition training for special education students in high school settings. PACER publishes the following newsletters: the PACESETTER, the ADVOCATE, and the Early Childhood CONNECTION. A complete catalog of PACER publications is available upon request.

Contact:
Marge Goldberg, Co-Director
Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights
Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights
4826 Chicago Avenue, South
Minneapolis, MN 55417-1055
(612) 827-2966 TDD and Voice
Fax: (612) 827-3065


Programs for Educational Opportunity
Programs for Educational Opportunity (PEO) is the combined Race, Gender, and National Origin Desegregation Assistance Center (DAC), based at the University of Michigan, funded under Title IV of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, since 1970. PEO is guided by the philosophy that all children deserve a quality education and that this education involves equal access to educational programs and activities, equal chances for academic achievement, fair treatment in formal policies and school environment, and equitable rewards and outcomes. PEO works collaboratively and without charge with public school districts in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin to achieve an equitable and quality education for their students. Activities provided by PEO include equity-related needs in assessment, planning, training, and consultative services. In addition, it disseminates equity-related publications and bibliographies. Staffs include educational equity professionals and a consultant pool of current practitioners and experts in a wide range of equity areas. PEO has provided information services to over three thousand school districts, and in-depth technical assistance to over three hundred school districts.

Contact:
Percy Bates, Director
Programs for Educational Opportunity
1005 School of Education
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Ml 48109-1259
(313) 763-9910
Fax: (313) 763-2137


Project RETAIN: Retention in Education Technical Assistance and Information Network
Project RETAIN Is designed to identify promising practices that (1) prepare students with mild disabilities for postsecondary employment/ education and (2) reduce the number of students with mild disabilities who leave school prior to graduation. The project is funded by the Florida Department of Education, Bureau of Education for Exceptional Students and is coordinated through Florida Network. Promising practices were determined by the (1) expansion of an existing statewide effective transition practices database to include components specific to dropout prevention, (2) identification of promising practices in drop-out prevention and criteria for measuring these practices, and (3) identification of programs that exemplify promising practices in dropout prevention. Project RETAIN is designed to meet the technical assistance needs of school personnel, families, and service providers in the replication of the identified promising practices.

Address:
Stuart E. Schwartz, Principal Investigator
Jeanne B. Repetto, Director
Project RETAIN
Florida Network: Information and Services for Adolescents and Adults with Special Needs
Department of Special Education
University of Florida
G315 Norman Hall
P.O. Box 117050
Gainesville, FL 32611-7050
(904) 392-0701
Fax: (904) 392-2655


Support Center for Educational Equity for Young Mothers
The Support Center was established to serve as a resource to policymakers, practitioners, and service providers working to improve educational opportunities for women who began childbearing before graduating from high school. Staff at the Support Center conduct research, produce reports, provide training, and offer technical assistance. The Support Center is a project of the School and Community Services division of the Academy for Educational Development. This division is committed to the notion of educational reform that stresses both excellence and equity. Much of its work focuses on four primary objectives: improving the access of poor youth to educationally sound programs, reducing school dropout rates, preventing adolescent pregnancy, and improving school-to-work transition.

Contact:
Elayne Archerren, Coordinator of Communication
Support Center for Educational Equity for Young Mothers
Academy for Educational Development
100 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10011
(212) 243-1110
Fax: (212) 627-0407


U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) supports programs that assist in educating children with special needs, provides for the rehabilitation of youth and adults with disabilities, and supports research to improve the lives of individuals with disabilities. Within the U.S. Department of Education, OSERS is one of thirteen offices, each of which plays a specific role in carrying out the Department's mission.

OSERS directs, coordinates, and recommends policy for special education programs and services designed to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities and to help them develop their full potential. Some programs administered by OSERS are designed to reduce dependency and to encourage the productive capabilities of persons who are disabled by providing independent living and vocational rehabilitation services. OSERS also administers funds for rehabilitation and special education research; for demonstration projects to foster knowledge, innovation, and improvement of services for persons who are disabled; and for dissemination of information about services, programs, and laws affecting individuals with disabilities.

OSERS is divided into three program areas: the Office of Special Education Programs, the Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

The OSERS Magazine reports on the latest initiatives and projects that OSERS is funding. It is published quarterly and is available at no charge. To request information relating to disability research, legislation, or services, write or call the OSERS Information and Coordination Staff.

Contact:
Judith Heumann, Assistant Secretary
Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services
U.S. Department of Education
Mary E. Switzer Bldg., Rm. 3132
40.0 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-2524
(202) 205-8723





EXEMPLARY PROGRAMS AND PRACTICES

ERIC/OSEP Special Project
Funded by a contract with the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) of the U.S. Department of Education, the ERIC/OSEP Special Project is operated by The Council for Exceptional Children, through the ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education. The Special Project performs two major functions: (1) to facilitate communication among researchers sponsored by OSEP and (2) to disseminate information about special education research to audiences involved in the development and delivery of special education services. Among these audiences are policymakers, teachers, administrators, and researchers. Special Project activities encompass tracking current research, planning and coordinating research conferences, and developing a variety of publications that synthesize or summarize recent research on critical issues and topics. Specific activities include an annual conference for research project directors, research forums, development of a series of oral histories of leaders in special education, and maintenance of databases containing ongoing research projects. The Special Project publishes the following products available to the public at minimal cost: annual directories of current research projects, research and resources on special education topical papers, research briefs for teachers, and Issue Briefs.

Contact:
ERIC/OSEP Special Project
Council for Exceptional Children
1920 Association Drive
Reston, VA 22091-1589
(703) 264-9482
Fax: (703) 264-9494


Pierce County Vocational/Special Education Cooperative
As a demonstration project, the Cooperative provides a model that confederations of school districts can use to capitalize on their own unique resources within the realms of vocational and special education to prepare mildly handicapped high school students for employment and/or postsecondary vocational training. A regional cooperative is established to provide data collection, staff development, and support services to the member districts. It also assists in developing and implementing effective, results-oriented process models. The Cooperative operates on the premise that mildly handicapped learners are better prepared for the working world when vocational and special educators systematically coordinate and consolidate their expertise. The Cooperative has demonstrated success in enhancing the rate and quality of employment and enrollment in postsecondary education for the targeted population. Awareness materials are available at minimal or no cost.

Contact:
James Hokstaff, Director
Pierce County Vocational/Special Education Cooperative
214 W. Main
Puyallup, WA 98371
(206) 841-8700
Fax: (206) 841-8655


Project ADAPT
Central to the Project ADAPT service delivery model is the concept of achieving student outcomes through changing the way that teachers teach and the way that students learn. This program provides a comprehensive service delivery model for secondary and postsecondary students who are learning disabled. The program increases the number of students receiving full-time service in the educational mainstream, reduces the dropout rate of students who are learning disabled, and improves their basic academic skills. Project ADAPT augments a school's existing LD service delivery system, improving the structure by increasing knowledge, skills, awareness, communication, and coordination. Three key areas for teacher adaptation are addressed: (1) teaching skills, (2) curricula and materials, and (3) collaboration. The project training process instructs teachers in using alternative organization, management, practice, presentation, and assessment techniques to adapt the regular classroom environment for the student with learning disabilities. All teachers learn to assess their curricula and teaching materials for appropriateness. Student adaptation is facilitated by the resource teacher through re-teaching and adaptive skill instruction. The goals are to remediate basic skill deficiency and equip learners with skills that will transfer to the regular classroom and to the world of work. Twenty-two percent of the students were mainstreamed on a full-time basis after one year in the project, 43% after two years (compared to a national average of 15%). Awareness materials are available at no cost. Awareness sessions, implementation, and follow-up services are available at a fee.

Contact:
Celia Meyers
Project ADAPT
123 E. Broadway
Cushing, OK 74023
(918) 225-1882


Project Partnerships
Project Partnerships provides 14- to 21-year-old high school students with severe disabilities the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to make the transition from school to work. Through the collaborative efforts of the New Hampshire Job Training Council, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Bureau of Special Education, the Bureau of Vocational-Technical Education, the Developmental Disabilities Council, the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services, and local school systems, the program seeks to provide all students with severe disabilities the educational, vocational, and community-related tools they will need to excel In school and to secure employment upon graduation. The program has facilitated collaboration among public agencies and local school systems to meet the needs of severely disabled students. It has identified employers interested in providing training experience and competitive employment to severely disabled students and provided access to vocational-technical education programs.

Contact:
Project Partnerships
New Hampshire Job Training Councils
64 Old Suncook Road
Concord, NH 03301
(603) 228-9500
(800) 772-7001 in New Hampshire
Fax: (603) 228-8557


Skills and Academics Grant Education
A joint venture between the Metro Area Vocational-Technical School District and Oklahoma City Schools since 1981, Skills and Academics Grant Education (SAGE) has served as an alternative high school for students classified as at-risk of not graduating from high school. In 1990, this cooperative effort was awarded the Governor's Excellence Award. SAGE is designed to integrate general education and vocational training to assist students in recognizing the relationship between academics and the world of work.

This unique school offers both vocational and academic programs. The seven vocational programs are (1) Auto Service Technology, (2) Business Technology, (3) Building Maintenance, (4) Carpentry, (5) Distributive Education/Marketing, (6) Motorcycle Technology, and (7) Welding. Academic programs offered include Mathematics, Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies. In addition, a Learning Resource Center is available for remedial support in reading and math. All classes use individualized instructional methods with maximum student-to-teacher ratios of fourteen to one. Students are referred to SAGE from the seven Oklahoma City district high schools. Support services available include nontraditional career counseling.

Contact:
SAGE Alternative High School
201 NE 48th Street
Oklahoma City, OK 73105
(405) 424-8324





SELECTED STATEWIDE SYSTEMS CHANGE PROJECTS


Kansas

Kansas State-Wide Systems Change Project
The purpose of this project is to increase the capacity of the state to ensure that children and youth with severe disabilities, including deaf-blindness, achieve their highest outcomes in normalized, nonsegregated, least restrictive settings. At the state level, the project will improve the current delivery of educational services by revising policies, monitoring procedures and legislation, and developing interagency agreements to support collaborative delivery of services for children and youth. The project will focus on development of five regional support team coordinators, five regional support teams, training modules, and three model internship sites. Regional support teams will train local staff within model districts. Inservice modules will be utilized to empower parents, staff, and administration with skills in effective practices, instructional leadership, collaborative instruction, and futures planning. Training will consist of site visitations, summer institutes, consultations, teacher exchanges, interactive television, and internships.

Contact:
Kansas State-Wide Systems Change Project
Kansas State Board of Education
Special Education Outcomes Team
120 SE 10th Avenue
Topeka, KS 66612
(913) 296-4949



Maryland

Maryland Least Restrictive Environment/ Neighborhood Inclusion Project
The purpose of this project will extend the commitment of the Maryland State Department of Education to improve the quality of special education services to students with disabilities and to change the delivery of those services from segregated to integrated settings. This project aims to establish model quality inclusive programs for students with severe disabilities in 16 local education agencies (LEAs) at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. To achieve this goal, several approaches will be used: training and consultation will be provided; information and support will be offered to families; certification standards and personnel preparation practices will be reviewed and modified; coordinated procedures and practices will be developed to promote the inclusion of students with disabilities in their home schools and communities; and information will be disseminated on inclusion, and on project activities, procedures, and outcomes.

Contact:
Jerry White
Maryland Least Restrictive Environment/Neighborhood Inclusion Project
Maryland State Department of Education
Division of Special Education
200 W. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 333-2480



Michigan

Systems Change for Inclusive Education in Michigan
This project will provide intensive statewide training and technical assistance to schools, including policy analysis and development, leadership development, and related activities. The project will facilitate the integration of students with disabilities into regular schools as part of a statewide effort to make schools more effective for all youth. Planned activities to be conducted will include information gathering, needs assessment, policy recommendation, work with twenty school districts, training and technical assistance, leadership development via a summer institute and regional support meetings, parent and advocacy support, establishment of an inclusive education support network, materials development, and the development of a consortium for integration and transition.

Contact:
Systems Change for Inclusive Education in Michigan
Developmental Disabilities Institute
Wayne State University
6001 Cass, 325 Justice
Detroit, Ml 48202
(313) 577-7981



Minnesota

Together We're Better: Inclusive School Communities in Minnesota--Partnerships for Change
The specific goals of this project are closely linked with current and projected statewide efforts in Minnesota. The project's purpose is to promote inclusion of children with severe disabilities in the schools the children would attend if they did not have disabilities. The objectives and practices of the project emphasize (1) the linkage of inclusion with current restructuring initiatives and best practices in general education; (2) collaboration with local school districts already taking leadership roles in inclusive education; (3) preservice personnel development in inclusive education; (4) staff development and ongoing information dissemination to local school agencies; (5) leadership training for families of children with severe disabilities; and (6) comprehensive evaluation and dissemination efforts.

Contact:
Together We're Better: Inclusive School Communities in Minnesota--Partnerships for Change
Office of Special Education
Department of Children, Families, and Learning, 8th Floor
550 Cedar Street
St. Paul, MN 55101
(612) 296-1793



New York

New York Partnership for Statewide Systems Change
The purpose of this project is to increase quality inclusive education program options, significantly increase the numbers of students with severe disabilities served in their home schools and regular classrooms (including deaf/blind), increase quality and frequency of meaningful interactions, revise and adapt innovative curricula and instructional strategies, evaluate the effectiveness of project activities, and disseminate effective systems change processes. The approach will include the application of a partnership model involving collaboration between the New York State Education Department, Syracuse University, and agencies responsible for the delivery of educational services and teacher education. Other approaches will include intensive inservice training, technical assistance activities, and materials development and dissemination.

Contact:
New York Partnership for Statewide Systems Change
New York Education Department
Office for Education of Children with Disabling Conditions
One Commerce Plaza, Room 1624
Albany, NY 12234
(518) 474-5548



Pennsylvania

Statewide Systems Change: Gateways Model for Integration
This project will facilitate the development of quality programs in integrated environments and thereby improve the acceptance of students with severe disabilities by the general public, professionals, and future employers. Project personnel will implement a systematic statewide effort in assisting school districts, intermediate units, area vocational technical schools, and community agencies to develop, implement, evaluate, and improve the quality of their integration programs. Practices that this project will use include community integration, community-based instruction, nonaversive behavior intervention, transition planning and training, and family involvement.

Contact:
Statewide Systems Change: Gateways Model for Integration
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Bureau of Special Education
333 Market Street, 7th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126
(717) 783-6913



Utah

Statewide Systems Change
This project will improve the quality of special education and related services for students with severe and multiple disabilities; establish policy and administrative support for statewide systems change activities; significantly increase the number of students with severe disabilities taught in age-appropriate regular schools while increasing the number and quality of interactions with nondisabled peers; increase appropriateness and effectiveness of instruction by regular special educators teaching students with severe disabilities by establishing model demonstration schools for inservice training; disseminate the project to all interested educators; and evaluate the effectiveness of the model and its components throughout the state.

Contact:
Statewide Systems Change
Utah State Office of Education
Special Education Unit
250 E. 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
(801) 538-7716





NNCCVTE CURRICULUM COORDINATION CENTERS

Six Curriculum Coordination Centers comprise the National Network for Curriculum Coordination in Vocational and Technical Education (NNCCVTE), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education. The network promotes the sharing of curriculum, the professional development of local and state educators, research in curriculum design and methodology, and coordination of development among states.



East Central Curriculum Coordination Center
States served are Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Contact:
Rebecca Woodhull, Director
East Central Curriculum Coordination Center
University of Illinois at Springfield, K-80
Springfield, IL 62794-9243
(217) 786-6173 Secretary to the Director
(217) 786-6375 Library Services
(800) 252-IVCC in IL


Midwest Curriculum Coordination Center
States served are Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Contact:
Julie Willcut, Contact Person
Midwest Curriculum Coordination Center
Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education
1500 W. 7th Avenue
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405) 743-5423
Fax: (405) 743-5142


Northeast Curriculum Coordination Center
States served are Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Vermont, and the Virgin Islands.

Contact:
Quentin Van Buren, Director
Northeast Curriculum Coordination Center
New Jersey State Department of Education
Division of Academic Program and Standards
Office of Adult and Occupational Education
Crest Way
Aberdeen, NJ 07747
(908) 290-1900
Fax: (908) 290-9678


Northwest Curriculum Coordination Center
States served are Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming.

Contact:
Bill Daniels, Director
Northwest Curriculum Coordination Center
Clover Park Technical College
4500 Steilacoom Boulevard, SW
Tacoma, WA 98499 4098
(206) 589-5764
Fax: (206) 589-5503


Southeast Curriculum Coordination Center
States served are Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee.

Contact:
Rebecca Love-Wilkes, Director
Southeast Curriculum Coordination Center
Mississippi State University
Research and Curriculum Unit
P.O. Drawer DX
Mississippi State, MS 39762
(601) 325-2510
Fax: (601) 325-3296


Western Curriculum Coordination Center
States and regions served are American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.

Contact:
Lawrence F. H. Zane, Director
Western Curriculum Coordination Center
University of Hawaii at Manoa
College of Education
1776 University Avenue, UAZ Room 7
Honolulu, HI 96844-0001
(808) 956-7834
(808) 956 6496
Fax: (808) 956-3374





STATE VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM CENTERS

The following curriculum centers offer free research, referral, and resource services to vocational education administrators in their state. Their resource centers' staff respond to requests in all vocational subject areas, including agriculture, business/distributive education, health, home economics, special needs, cooperative education, industrial arts, plus the vocational education concerns of gender equity and guidance. Specific services available from the centers may vary, but generally include workshops in curriculum development and use, reprinting/production, and the dissemination of curriculum and instructional materials.

This section contains a current list of curriculum centers that responded to the Office of Special Populations (OSP) update request by mid-September 1994. For any changes, updates, and other additional information, please contact the OSP office.



Alabama

Vocational Curriculum Research, Evaluation Center
James Kendrick, Coordinator
Division of Vocational Education Services
50 N. Ripley Street
P.O. Box 302101
Room 5234, Gordon Persons Building
Montgomery, AL 36130-2101
(334) 242-9108
Fax: (334) 242-0234



Alaska

Alaska Vocational Materials Library
Sue Ethelbah, Contact Person
Alaska Department of Education
Adult and Vocational Education
801 W. Tenth Street, Suite 200
Juneau, AK 99801
(907) 465-8729
Fax: (907) 465-2982



Arizona

Arizona Center for Vocational Technological Education (ACVTE)
Gaye Luna, Director
Joanie Hoffman, Business Manager
P.O. Box 6025
Northern Arizona University
Flagstaff, AZ 86011
(520) 523-5442
Fax: (542) 523-6395



Arkansas

Arkansas Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center (AVCDC)
Bobbie T. Biggs, Director
Graduate Education Building, Room 115
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
(501) 575-6606
(800) 632-8754 in AR
Fax: (501) 575-4681



Georgia

Vocational Education Curriculum Center (VECC)
North Georgia RESA
Paul Vail, Director
Route 3, Box 232-A
Ellijay, GA 30540
(706) 276-1111
Fax: (706) 276-1114



Hawaii

Hawaii Vocational Curriculum Center (HAVCC)
Lawrence F. H. Zane, Director
Barbara Luckner-Loveless, Associate Director
1776 University Avenue, UA2-Room 7
University of Hawaii
Honolulu, HI 96844-0001
(808) 956-7834
Fax: (808) 956-3374



Idaho

Idaho Vocational Curriculum Dissemination Center
Don Eshelby, Director
Cari Manry, Coordinator
College of Education, 209
University of Idaho
Moscow, ID 83844-3083
(208) 885-6556
Fax: (208) 885-6869



Illinois

Illinois Vocational Curriculum Center
Rebecca Woodhull, Director
University of Illinois at Springfield, K-80
Springfield, IL 62794-9243
(217) 786-6375
(800) 252-IVCC in IL
Fax: (217) 786-6036



Indiana

Education and Training Resources (ETR)
Indiana University
James Pershing, Executive Director
Smith Research Center
2805 E. 10th Street
Bloomington, IN 47408
(812) 855-6711
(800) 544-1469 in IN
Fax: (812) 855-9156



Kansas

Kansas Competency-Based Curriculum Center (KCBCC)
Ben L. Clay, Coordinator
Benton Hall - 412
Washburn University-SAS
1700 College
Topeka, KS 66621
(913) 231-1010, ext. 1534
Fax: (913) 231-1027

Kansas Vocational Curriculum Resources Center (CRC)
Mark L. Johnson, Director
Pittsburg State University
115 Willard Hall
Pittsburg, KS 66762
(316) 235-4629
(316) 235-4628
Fax: (316) 235-4006



Kentucky

Instructional Support
Julie Cave, Branch Manager
2019 Capitol Plaza Tower
500 Mero Street
Frankfort KY 40601
(502) 564-8324
Fax: (502) 564-4800



Louisiana

Louisiana Technical Resource Center (LTRC)
Mervin Birdwell, Director
P.O. Box 1159
Natchitoches, LA 71458-1159
(318) 357-3155
Fax: (318) 357-3108



Maine

Vocational Curriculum Resource Center of Maine (VCRCOM)
Susan N. Donar, Director
Kennebec Valley Technical College (KVTC)
92 Western Avenue
Fairfield, ME 04937-1367
(207) 453-5170
(207) 453-5198 Electronic Bulletin Board
Fax: (207) 453-5197



Massachusetts

Massachusetts Vocational Curriculum Resource Center (MVCRC)
John McDonagh, Director
758 Marrett Road
Lexington, MA 02173-7398
(617) 863-1863
(800) 356-8272 in MA
Fax: (617) 863-9965



Michigan

Michigan Center for Career and Technical Education (MCCTE)
Cas Heilman, Director
Gloria Kielbaso, Director
133 Erickson Hall
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Ml 48824
(517) 353-4397
(800) 292-1606 in Ml
Fax: (517) 432-2931



Minnesota

Minnesota Educational Services at Capitol View Center
JoAnne Collins, Director
70 W. County Road B-2
Little Canada, MN 55117-1402
(612) 483-4442
(800) 652-9024 in MN
(800) 848 4912
Fax: (612) 483-0234



Mississippi

Research and Curriculum Unit (R/CU)
Mississippi State University
Ronda Cummings, Project Director
Research and Curriculum Unit
Drawer DX
Mississippi State, MS 39762
(601) 325-2510
Fax: (601) 325-3296



Missouri

Instructional Materials Lab (IML)
Harley Schlichting, Director
8 London Hall
University of Missouri
Columbia, MO 65211
(314) 882-2884
(800) 392-7217 in MO
(800) 669-2465
Fax: (314) 882-9935



Montana

Montana Center for Research, Curriculum and Personnel Development
Gus Korb, Director
Northern Montana College
Box 7751
Havre, MT 59501
(406) 265-3726
Fax: (406) 265-3777



Nebraska

Nebraska Vocational Curriculum Resource Center (NVCRC)
Lyle Colsden, Director
Mary Jo Kulp, Coordinator
University of Nebraska at Kearney
West Center, W209
Kearney, NE 68849
(308) 865-8462
Fax: (308) 865-8669



New Hampshire

Learning Resources Center (LRC)
Judith Hildebrandt, Coordinator
Mason Library
Keene State College
Keene, NH 03435-3201
(603) 358-2750
(603) 358-2749
Fax: (603) 358-2743



New Mexico

Vocational Information and Program Services (VIPS)
E. Pam Montrose, Director
NNMC-El Rito Campus
El Rito, NM 87530
(505) 581-4157
(800) 649-1700
Fax: (505) 581-4159



North Dakota

North Dakota Vocational Curriculum Library (NDVCL)
Steph Borud, Director
Bismarck State College
1500 Edwards Avenue
Bismarck, ND 58501
(701) 224-5487
Fax: (701) 224-5551



Ohio

Vocational Instructional Materials Laboratory
Deborah Bingham-Catri, Director
1900 Kenny Road
Columbus, OH 43210
(614) 292-5001
(614) 292-4277 for sales
(800) 848-4815
Fax: (614) 292-1260

Ohio Agricultural Education Curriculum Materials Service (OH CMS)
William D. Waidelich, Director
254 Agriculture Administration Building
Ohio State University
2120 Fyffe Road
Columbus, OH 43210-1067
(614) 292-4848
Fax: (800) 292-4919



Oklahoma

Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center (CIMC)
John W. Friedemann, CIMC Coordinator
Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education
1500 W. 7th Avenue
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405) 377-2000, ext. 589
(800) 654-4502
Fax: (405) 743-5154

Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education Resource Center
Denise Christy, Director
1500 W. 7th Avenue
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405) 743-5161
(800) 522-5810 in OK
(800) 654-4502
Fax: (405) 743-5142



Pennsylvania

PDE Resource Center
Evelyn Werner, Director
Vocational Education Information Network (VEIN)
Pennsylvania Department of Education
333 Market Street
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
(717) 783-919
(800) 992-2283 in PA
Fax: (717) 783-5420



South Carolina

Occupational Curriculum Development Section
Roger C. Goupil, Curriculum Coordinator
Amy McCaskill, Education Associate
Office of Occupational Education
1831 Barnwell Street
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 253-4029
Fax: (803) 253-4035



South Dakota

South Dakota Curriculum Center (SDCC)
Wendy Bonaiuto, Director
Judy Zikmund, Vocational-Technical Resources
435 S. Chapelle
Pierre, SD 57501-3210
(605) 224-6287
Fax: (605) 224-8320



Tennessee

Division of Vocational Education Curriculum Center
Lynne Cohen, Director
Tennessee Department of Education
710 James Robertson Parkway, 4th Floor
Nashville, TN 37243-0383
(615) 532-2837
Fax: (615) 532-8226



Texas

Home Economics Curriculum Center (HECC)
Texas Tech University
Marilyn Wragg, Director
Texas Tech University
P.O. Box 41161
Lubbock, TX 79409-1161
(806) 742-3029
Fax: (806) 742-3034

Educational Development and Training Center
East Texas State University
Mary Hendrix, Director
E.T. Station
Commerce, TX 75429
(903) 886-5624
(800) 356-3382
Fax: (903) 886-5744

Instructional Materials Service (IMS)
Neil Overstreet, Coordinator
Texas A & M University
College Station, TX 77843
(409) 845-6601
Fax: (409) 845-6608



Vermont

Vermont Home Economics Resource Materials (VHERM)
Irene Shover, Coordinator
Linda Desjarlais, Project Manager
Oxbow Vocational Center
PO Box 618
Bradford, VT 05033
(802) 222-5212, ext. 32
Fax: (802) 222-9002



Virginia

Virginia Vocational Curriculum and Resource Center (WCRC)
Margaret L. Watson, Center Director
Suzanne B. Trevvett, Writer/Editor
2200 Mountain Road
Glen Allen, VA 23060-2208
(804) 261-5075
Fax: (804) 261-5079



Washington

Northwestern Curriculum Coordination Center
William Daniels, Director
R. Kathleen Burdette, Coordinator
Clover Park Technical College
4500 Steilacoom Boulevard, SW
Tacoma, WA 98499-4098
(206) 589-5764
Fax: (206) 589-5503



West Virginia

Curriculum Technology Resource Center
Keith James, Director
Cedar Lake Conference Center
Ripley, WV 25271
(304) 372-7874
(800) 982-5627 in WV
Fax: (304) 372-7875





STATE PERSONNEL RESPONSIBLE FOR VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, DISADVANTAGES,
AND LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY


Alabama

James Kendrick
State Coordinator
Division of Vocational Education Services
5234 Gordon Person Building, Box 302101
50 N. Ripley Street
Montgomery, AL 36130-2101
(205) 242-9108



Alaska

Sue Ethelbah
Program Administrator
Education Program Support (EPS)
Alaska Department of Education
Vocational Education
801 W. 10th Street, Suite 200
Juneau, AK 99801-1894
(907) 465-8729



Arizona

Karlene Darby
Director of Program Support
Arizona Department of Education
1535 W. Jefferson
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 542-3450

Tina Ammon
Program Specialist Guidance
State Department of Education
1535 W. Jefferson
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 542-5074

Randy Eubank
Program Specialist, LEP/Guidance
Arizona Department of Education
Division of Vocational Education
1535 W. Jefferson
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 255-5075

Marilee Johnson
Program Specialist, Disabled
State Department of Education
1535 W. Jefferson
Phoenix, AZ 85007
(602) 542-3437



Arkansas

Mary B. Williams
Program Manager
Vocational and Technical Education Division
Special Needs Section
#3 Capitol Mall
Luther S. Hardin Building - Room 305D
Little Rock, AR 72201-1083
(501) 682-1800



California

Susan Reese
State Director of Career-Vocational Education
State Department of Education
Curriculum Instruction Leadership Branch
721 Capitol Mall, 4th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 657-2532

Chris Rury
Liaison to Special Populations
Career-Vocational Education Division
California Department of Education
721 Capitol Mall, 4th Floor
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 657-4995



Colorado

Lindsey Antle
Program Manager - Special Populations
Colorado Community College and Occupational Education
1391 N. Speer Boulevard, Suite 600
Denver, CO 80204-2554
(303) 620-4000



Connecticut

Joseph Petrone
Consultant, Special Populations Programs
State Department of Education
25 Industrial Park Road
Division of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education
Middletown, CT 06457-1543
(203) 638-4058



Delaware

Adam W. Fisher
State Supervisor
Vocational Education for Exceptional Children
Department of Public Instruction
Dover, DE 19903-1402
(302) 739-4681

Martha Brooks
Team Leader, Exceptional Children's Programs
Department of Public Instruction
P.O. Box 1402
Dover, DE 19903-1402
(302) 739-5471



District Of Columbia

Cynthia Bell
Asst. Superintendent
Vocational and Adult Education
Penn Center, 1709 Third Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 576-6311

Charles Webb
Assistant for Special Needs
Logan Administrative Unit
3rd and G Street, NE
Washington, DC 20002
(202) 976-6308



Florida

Janet Adams
Coordinator
Florida Department of Education
FEC #1214
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
(904) 487-3164

F. Patricia Hall
Bureau Chief
Florida Department of Education
FEC #1214
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
(904) 488-7153

Jane Silveria
Program Specialist III
Florida Department of Education
FEC #1214
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0400
(904) 487-1603



Georgia

Naomi Dorsey
State Supervisor
Georgia Department of Education
Special Needs Programs
Office of Vocational Education
1770 Twin Towers East
Atlanta, GA 30334
(404) 657-8324

Loydia Webber
State Supervisor, Postsecondary
Georgia Department of Education
Special Needs Programs
Office of Vocational Education
660 S. CNN Center
Atlanta, GA 30335
(404) 656-5845



Hawaii

Alan R. Kohan
State Director of Vocational Education
University of Hawaii
Sinclair Annex 1, Room 4
1633 Bachmann Place
Honolulu, HI 96822
(808) 956-7461

Larry Higeshi
Department of Education
Special Program Management
3430 Leahi Avenue
Honolulu, HI 96815
(808) 735-9025

Helene Sokugawa
Coordinator of Personnel Development
Office of the State Director for Vocational Education
1221 Kapiolani Boulevard, Suite 220
Honolulu, HI 96814
(808) 591-1888



Idaho

Sam Byrd
Special Populations Coordinator
Division of Vocational Education
P.O. Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0095
(208) 334-3216

Dick Winn
Marketing
State Division of Vocational Education
P.O. Box 83720
Boise, ID 83720-0095
(208) 334-3216



Illinois

Sharon Full
Supervisor
Illinois State Board of Education
Department of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education
100 N. First Street, C-421
Springfield, IL 62777
(217) 782-4876

Virginia Dorn
Consultant
Illinois State Board of Education
Department of Adult, Vocational and Technical Education
100 N. First Street, C-421
Springfield, IL 62777
(217) 782-0710



Indiana

Carla Phillippi
Special Needs Coordinator
Indiana Department of Education
Office of Career and Vocational Services
Room 229 State House
Indianapolis, IN 46204-2798
(317) 232-9184



Iowa

Evelyn Anderson
Consultant, Special Needs
Department of Education
Bureau of Educational and Student Services
Grimes State Office Building
Des Moines, IA 50319-0146
(515) 281-3866

Sandra Schmitz
Consultant - Mental Disabilities
Department of Education
Bureau of Special Education
Grimes State Office Building
Des Moines, IA 50319-0146
(515) 281-3954



Kansas

Carolyn Olson
Consultant
State Board of Education
Technical Education
120 SE Tenth Avenue
Topeka, KS 66612-1142
(913) 296-3958

Lynn Hughes
Education Program Consultant
State Board of Education
120 SE Tenth Avenue
Topeka, KS 66612-1142
(913) 296-2222



Kentucky

Donnalie Stratton
Special Vocational Programs Unit
2119 Capital Plaza Tower
500 Mero Street
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-3775

Betty Hughes
Special Vocational Programs Unit
2119 Capital Plaza Tower
500 Mero Street
Frankfort, KY 40601
(502) 564-3775



Louisiana

Joycelyn Brunswick
Special Needs Populations Coordinator
Louisiana Department of Education
P.O. Box 94064
Baton Rouge, LA 70804
(504) 342-3551

Thelma Hughes
JTPA
Louisiana State Department of Education
Administrative Services
Office of Vocational Education
P.O. Box 94064
Baton Rouge, LA 70804-9064
(504) 342-3551



Maine

Joseph Lessard
Coordinator
Maine State Department of Education
State House Station #23
Augusta, ME 04333
(207) 287-5854



Maryland

Ruth Pear
Regional Coordinator
Maryland Department of Education
Division of Career Technology and Adult Education
200 W. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 333-2587

John Valenzano
Lead Coordinator
Maryland Department of Education
Division of Career Technology and Adult Education
200 W. Baltimore Street
Baltimore, MD 21201
(410) 333-2048



Massachusetts

Pamela Kaufmann
Vocational Special Needs Administrator
Massachusetts Department of Education
Division of Occupational Education
350 Main Street
Malden, MA 02148-5023
(617) 388-3300



Michigan

Terri Giannola
Consultant
Michigan Department of Education
Vocational-Technical Education Service
Special Populations, Programs and Services
P.O. Box 30009
Lansing, Ml 48909
(517) 335-0375



Minnesota

Lloyd A. Petri
Manager
Minnesota Technical College System
Supplemental Support Services
Capitol Square, 550 Cedar Street
St. Paul, MN 55101
(612) 296-2337

Lezlie Ingvalson
Specialist
Minnesota Department of Education
Secondary Vocational Education
808 Capitol Square, 550 Cedar Street
St. Paul, MN 55101
(612) 296-6127

Jessie Montano
Team Leader
Minnesota Department of Education
Secondary Vocational Education
808 Capitol Square, 550 Cedar Street
St. Paul, MN 55101
(612) 296 2181



Mississippi

Morris Murray
Coordinator
State Department of Education
Vocational Services for Special Populations
Office of Vocational Technical and Adult Education
P.O. Box 771
Jackson, MS 39205-0771
(601) 359-3953

Jerome Brock
Program Specialist
State Department of Education
Vocational Services for Special Populations
Office of Vocational Technical and Adult Education
P.O. Box 771
Jackson, MS 39205-0771
(601) 359-3953



Missouri

Dick Omer
Assistant Director of Vocational Special Needs and Guidance Services
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
Division of Vocational Education
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(314) 751-1394

Steve Alexander
Supervisor, Special Needs and Guidance
Department of Education
Division of Vocational Education
P.O. Box 480
Jefferson City, MO 65102
(314) 751-1394



Montana

Jeff Wulf
Department of Vocational Education
Office of Public Instruction
Helena, MT 59620
(406) 444-2413

Jim Whealon
State Director
Department of Vocational Education
Office of Public Instruction
State Capitol
Helena, MT 59620
(406) 444-3095



Nebraska

Evelyn Lavaty
Director
Nebraska Department of Education
Student Services Guidance and Special Populations
P.O. Box 94987
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
(402) 471-4811

Richard Campbell
Director
Nebraska Department of Education
Cooperative Programs and Secondary Vocational Special Needs
P.O. Box 94987
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
(402) 471-2432



Nevada

Keith Rheault
Director, Occupational and Continuing Education
Department of Education
Handicapped and Disadvantaged
400 W. King Street, Capitol Complex
Carson City, NV 89710
(702) 687-3144



New Hampshire

Franklin Dye
Curriculum Supervisor for the Handicapped and Disadvantaged
New Hampshire State Department of Education
Bureau of Vocational-Technical Education
101 Pleasant Street
Concord, NH 03301-3860
(603) 271-2452



New Jersey

Cynthia Bowman
Program Development Specialist
New Jersey State Department of Education
CN500
Division of Adult and Occupational Education
Trenton, NJ 08625-0500
(609) 984-5911



New Mexico

Margaret Mendoza
Special Populations Coordinator
New Mexico State Department of Education
Vocational-Technical and Adult Education
Education Building
Santa Fe, NM 87503
(505) 827-6665



New York

Mary Ellen Colella
Associate
State Department of Education
Regional Office, Room 313, Third Floor
800 4th Street
Liverpool, NY 13088
(315) 453-3100

Jeanette Canaday
Workforce Preparation Team
State Department of Education
Education Building, Third Floor
89 Washington Avenue
Albany, NY 12234
(518) 474-4809



North Carolina

Pamela S. Davis
Special Populations Consultant
Department of Vocational Education
301 N. Wilmington Street
Education Building
Raleigh, NC 27603-1712
(919) 715-1650



North Dakota

Garry Freier
Supervisor of Special Needs
State Board for Vocational Education
15th Floor Capitol Tower
Bismarck, ND 58505
(701) 224-3178



Ohio

Sandy Muir
Supervisor, Vocational Education-Special Education Liaison
Ohio Department of Education
65 S. Front Street, Room 912
Columbus, OH 43215-4183
(614) 466-5718

Jim Pinchak
Associate Director
Ohio Department of Education
65 S. Front Street, Room 904
Columbus, OH 43215-4183
(614) 466-2095



Oklahoma

Jeanetta Shipp
Assistant Coordinator
State Department of Vocational Technical Education
Disadvantaged and Handicapped Services
1500 W. Seventh
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405) 743-5139

Melanie Eick
OCR Project Leader
State Department of Vocational Technical Education
1500 W. Seventh
Stillwater, OK 74074-4364
(405) 743-5138



Oregon

Ralph Yoshimura
Specialist
Oregon Department of Education
Disadvantaged and Handicapped
700 Pringle Parkway, SE
Salem, OR 97310-0290
(503) 378-3584



Pennsylvania

Marjorie Lowe Blaze
Supervisor
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Bureau of Vocational and Adult Education
333 Market Street, 6th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
(717) 787-8022

Emmanuel Constantine
Specialist
Pennsylvania Department of Education
Disadvantaged and LEP
Bureau of Vocational and Adult Education
333 Market Street, 6th Floor
Harrisburg, PA 17126-0333
(717) 787-8022



Rhode Island

Arthur Tartaglione
State Career Education Coordinator
Bureau of Vocational and Adult Education
Rhode Island Department of Education
22 Hayes Street
Providence, RI 02908
(401) 277-2691

Jacqueline Harrington
Specialist II - Handicapped
State Department of Education
Division of Vocational and Adult Education
22 Hayes Street
Providence, RI 02908
(401) 277-2691



South Carolina

Ann Winstead
Coordinator of Technical Assistance
State Department of Education
Division of Curriculum
1429 Senate Street, Room 504
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 734-8357

Steve Abbott
Education Associate
State Department of Education
1429 Senate Street, Room 917
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 734-8483



South Dakota

Michael L. Ryan
Supervisor, Special Needs
Office of Vocational Education
State Department of Education
Richard F. Kneop Building
Pierre, SD 57501
(605) 773-4735



Tennessee

Sam McClanahan
Director, Program Services
Division of Vocational Technical Education
Department of Education
Gateway Plaza, 4th Floor
710 James Robertson Parkway
Nashville, TN 37219
(615) 532-2834



Texas

Lorraine Merrick
Senior Director
Texas Education Agency
1701 N. Congress Avenue
Austin, TX 78701
(512) 463-9446



Utah

Ken Hennefer
Specialist - Transition and Applied Technology for Special Populations
Utah State Office of Education Instructional Services
250 E. 500 South
Salt Lake City, UT 84111
(801) 538-7727



Vermont

Tony Campbell
Special Needs Consultant
State Department of Education
Vocational Education for Disadvantaged and Handicapped Programs
120 State Street
Montpelier, VT 05602
(802) 828-3101



Virginia

James A. Gray, Jr.
Principal Specialist for Vocational Education
Virginia Department of Education
P.O. Box 2120
Richmond, VA 23216-2120
(804) 225-2877

Lolita B. Hall
Specialist, Vocational Special Programs
Virginia Department of Education
101 N. 14th Street
P.O. Box 2120
Richmond, VA 23219
(804) 225-3370



Washington

Carlane J. H. Washington
Program Supervisor
Special Needs - Office of Civil Rights
Old Capitol Building
P.O. Box 47200
Olympia, WA 98504-7200
(206) 753-0555



West Virginia

Jean Cary Davis
Supervisor
Special Populations Services
Division of Technical and Adult Education Services
West Virginia Department of Education
1900 Kanawha Boulevard East
Charleston, WV 25305
(304) 558-2349



Wisconsin

Tom Heffron
Consultant - Special Services
State Board of Voc-Tech and Adult Education
310 Price Place, P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707
(608) 266-3738

Deborah Mahaffey
Bureau Director
State Board of Voc-Tech and Adult Education
310 Price Place, P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707
(608) 266-5858

Jim Mueller
Consultant - Basic Skills/JTPA
State Board of Voc-Tech and Adult Education
310 Price Place, P.O. Box 7874
Madison, WI 53707
(608) 266-2095

Preston Smeltzer
Vocational Special Needs
Bureau of Vocational Education
Division for Instructional Services
P.O. Box 7841
Madison, WI 53707-7841
(608) 266-7987



Wyoming

Margie Simineo
Director
Applied Technology/Vocational and Data
State Department of Education
2nd Floor, Hathaway Building
Cheyenne, WY 82002
(307) 777-7415



Virgin Islands

Rupert W. Ross, Jr.
Assistant Commissioner
Department of Education
# 44-46 Kongens Gade
Charlotte Amalie
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 00802
(809) 774-7832




INDEX

Titles of Resources


Ability Grouping, Aspirations, and Attainments: Evidence from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988. The Journal of Negro Education, 62(3)

Access and Equity in Vocational Education (Trends and Issues Alerts)

Access to and Use of Vocational Education in Teen Parent Programs

Access to Post-Secondary Education: A Faculty Handbook (Rev. Ed.)

Alternative Education Programs: A Prescription for Success

Alternative Uses of Ability Grouping: Can We Bring High-Quality Instruction to Low-Ability Classes?

America's Agenda: Schools for the 21st Century

Annotated Resource List: Women and Girls in Vocational Education

ASCD Update

Beyond Separate Education: Quality Education for All

Blueprints for Indian Education: Research and Development Needs for the 1990S

Challenges for a Service System in Transition: Ensuring Quality Community Experiences for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

Child Language Disability (Volume III)

Children with Exceptional Needs in Regular Classrooms

Collaborative Teaming for Inclusion-Oriented Schools: A Resource Manual

The Comprehensive Local School: Regular Education for All Students with Disabilities

Creating Individual Supports for People with Developmental Disabilities: A Mandate for Change at Many Levels

Curriculum Adaptation for Inclusive Classrooms

A Curriculum Development Process for Inclusive Classrooms. Focus on Exceptional Children, 25(4)

Decisions in Sequence: How to Make Placements in the Least Restrictive Environment. EDLAW Briefing Paper, 2(9-10)

Detracking Schools: Early Lessons from the Field. Phi Delta Kappan, 73(6)

Developing Effective Vocational Programs for Mentally Retarded Persons: Cooperative Planning Between Rehabilitation and Education. Journal of Rehabilitation, 52(2)

The Disadvantages of Tracking and Ability Grouping:
A Look at Cooperative Learning as an Alternative


Educating All Students in the Mainstream of Regular Education

Educational Programs and Achievements of Secondary Special Education Students: Findings from the National Longitudinal Transition Study

Effective Mainstreaming: Creating Inclusive Classrooms (2nd Ed.)

Employment of Persons with Dual Sensory Impairments: Strategies for Inclusion. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 16(3)

Ensuring Quality School-to-Work Opportunities for Young Women

ERIC/OSEP Special Project

Exceptional Children

The Exceptional Student in the Regular Classroom (5th Ed.)

Factors That Affect Nontraditional Vocational Enrollment Among Women. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 9

Final Report, Volume V: Handicapped and Disadvantaged Students: Access to Quality Vocational Education

Focus on Exceptional Children

The Growing Need for Quality Vocational Education Programs for Individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP), (TASPP Brief, 1(4)

A Guide for Educating Mainstreamed Students (4th Ed.)

A Guide to Occupational Education for Students with Handicapping Conditions

HEATH Resource Directory, 1991

Helping Students Succeed in the Regular Classroom: A Guide for Developing Intervention Assistance Programs

Immigrant Students: Their Legal Right of Access to Public Schools: A Guide for Advocates and Educators

The Inclusion Revolution, Research Bulletin, 11

Inclusion Times for Children and Youth with Disabilities

Inclusive Education and Transition. Impact, 5(3)

Inclusive Education for Learners with Severe Disabilities: Print and Media Resources

Inclusive Education Programs

Innovations: School Inclusion Project

Integrating Deaf Students into Technical Classes. School Shop, 47(7)

Integration/Inclusion Needs Assessment (Rev. Ed.)

The Integration of Students with Special Needs into Regular Classrooms: Policies and Practices That Work

Integration of Visually Handicapped Students in Industrial Education Classes: An Overview. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 78(7)

Issues and Research in Special Education, Volume I

Issues in Vocational Education for Special Populations in Rural Areas, (TASPP Brief, 2(2)

Journal for Vocational Special Needs Education

Journal of Career Assessment

Journal of Child and Family Studies

Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Problems: Reclaiming Children and Youth

The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps

LRE and the Placement of Students with Severe Disabilities. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 17(3)

Making Sense of Ability Grouping. Instructor, 102(9)

Manual for Accessibility, Conference, Meeting, and Lodging Facilities as Adopted by the National Rehabilitation Association (Rev. Ed.)

The McGill Action Planning System (MAPS): A Strategy for Building the Vision. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 14(3)

A Model to Improve the Quality and Quantity of Minority Student Participation in Vocational-Technical Education Programs

Nasty Girls, Thugs, and Humans Like Us: Social Relations Between Severely Disabled and Nondisabled Students in High School

A National Survey of Mainstreamed Hearing Impaired High School Sophomores. Journal of Rehabilitation, 51(1)

Newsnotes

New Voices: Immigrant Students in U.S. Public Schools

Parent Primer: Secondary Programs for Students with Severe Disabilities

Participation of Special Education Students in High School Vocational Education: The Influence of School Characteristics

Perspectives in Education and Deafness

Pierce County Vocational/Special Education Cooperative

Population Today

The Postsecondary Student with Learning Disabilities: Issues in Identification and Integration Manual

Practical Considerations in the Use of Technology to Facilitate the Inclusion of Students with Severe Disabilities. Technology and Disability, 3(2)

Project ADAPT

Project Partnerships

Promoting Effective Educational Practices Through Public School and University Partnerships: A Tale of One City's Response to Full Integration

Promoting Inclusion for All Students with Disabilities

Report Card to the Nation on Inclusion in Education of Students with Mental Retardation

Restructuring for Caring and Effective Education:
An Administrative Guide to Creating Heterogeneous Schools


The Role of the Classroom Teacher as a Curriculum Leader. NASSP Bulletin, 76(547)

School-College Alliances: Benefits for Low-Income Minorities (ERIC Digest No. 53)

The School Counselor and Comprehensive Programs for Work-Bound Youth

School-to-Work Transition Services for Disadvantaged Youth Enrolled in Vocational Education

Secondary Programs for Students with Developmental Disabilities

Skills and Academics Grant Education

Social Integration and Severe Disabilities: A Longitudinal Analysis of Child Outcomes. The Journal of Special Education, 25(3)

Step by Step: The Educational Equity Options Project. A Program Manual

Successful Detracking in Middle and Senior High Schools (ERIC Digest No. 82)

Successful Mainstreaming: Proven Ways to Detect and Correct Special Needs

Support Networks for Inclusive Schooling: Interdependent Integrated Education

Teaching Social Skills to Hearing-Impaired Students

Techniques for Including Students with Disabilities:
A Step-by-Step Practical Guide for School Principals


Their Senior Year: Family and Service Provider Perspectives on the Transition from School to Adult Life for Young Adults with Disabilities. The Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 19(1)

Transition from School to Work: The Alternative Cooperative Education Handbook

Transitions to Least Restrictive Environments: A Guide to Transition (Rev. Ed.)

Untracking and College Enrollment: Research Report 4

Vocational Counseling for Special Populations

Vocational Education for Special Populations: Recommendations for Improving State Policy

Vocational Education Performance Standards (ERIC Digest No. 96)

Vocational Education: Status in School Year 1990-91 and Early Signs of Change at Secondary Level

Why Ability Grouping Must End: Achieving Excellence and Equity in American Education

Winners All: A Call for Inclusive Schools



INDEX

Titles of Resources in Alphabetical Order


Appalachia Educational Laboratory

The Arc

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Center for Success in Learning

Closing the Gap

Council for Exceptional Children

Council of Chief State School Officers

ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education

ERIC Clearinghouse on Handicapped and Gifted Children

GED Testing Service

HEATH Resource Center

National Center on Educational Outcomes

National Federation of the Blind

National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities

National Rehabilitation Information Center

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

Parent Advocacy Coalition for Educational Rights

Programs for Educational Opportunity

Project RETAIN: Retention in Education Technical Assistance and Information Network

Support Center for Educational Equity for Young Mothers

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services


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