701.21 What is the difference between an exemplary and a promising program?

  1. A panel may recommend to the Secretary that a program be designated as promising if the panel determines that the program is at least acceptable on each of the four categories of standards in 701.22 (Evidence of Success / Effectiveness, Quality of the program, Educational significance and Usefulness to others). To be judged acceptable in the category of evidence of effectiveness all of the following criteria must be met. A promising program must: The combination of this positive evidence of effectiveness and potential replicability creates a significant probability that the program will eventually be able to provide evidence to support claims of exemplary meritorious results as defined in the following section (b).

  2. A panel may recommend to the Secretary that a program be designated as exemplary if the panel determines that the program is excellent on each of the four categories of standards in 701.22 (Evidence of Success / Effectiveness, Quality of the program, Educational significance and Usefulness to others).

    To be judged excellent under the category of evidence of success/ effectiveness all of the following criteria must be met. There must be convincing evidence that very important claims of positive results (or performance outcomes) can be:

701.22 What criteria are used to evaluate programs for exemplary or promising designation?

In determining whether an educational program ("program" includes educational polices, research findings, practices and products) should be recommended as exemplary, promising, or neither, each expert panel shall consider the following four criteria categories: evidence of effectiveness/ success, quality, educational significance and usefulness to others. Each panel must address all criteria specified in (a) below for the category of evidence of effectiveness/ success.

On the other three standards categories of quality, significance and usefulness to others, each panel may add to the core criteria and establish its own decision framework for designation as promising and exemplary. It is expected that the panels will require an acceptable judgment on almost all criteria within each of these three categories for a designation as promising and a judgment of excellence on almost all criteria within each of the three categories for a designation as exemplary. For a program to be designated exemplary any weaknesses must be minimal and easily corrected.

  1. Evidence of effectiveness/ success.
    1. To be judged acceptable in the category of evidence of effectiveness all of the following criteria must be met. A promising program must:
      • have defensible overall evidence supporting claims of worthwhile performance results (without substantial harmful results) at one or more sites (without failing at a large number of other sites)
      • have logical or other evidence of adaptability or transportability to other sites.
      The combination of this positive evidence of effectiveness and potential replicability creates a significant probability that the program will eventually be able to provide evidence to support claims of exemplary meritorious results as defined in the following section.

    2. To be judged excellent under the category of evidence of success/effectiveness all of the following criteria must be met. Thus an exemplary program must have convincing evidence that very important claims of positive results (or performance outcomes) can be:
      • reasonably attributed to the program, and
      • that evidence to support these claims of worthwhile results was sustained in multiple site replications within the past few years (without failing at a large number of other sites or being accompanied by harmful results).
  2. Quality. The panels will make their judgments about quality by reviewing the program materials and determining the extent to which the program:
    1. is congruent with sound research and practice
    2. incorporates accurate and up-to-date information/content
    3. promotes equity and is free of bias based on race, gender, age, culture, ethnic origin, disability, or limited English proficiency
    4. is appropriate, engaging, and motivating for the intended audiences
    5. contains materials that conform to accepted standards of technical product quality.
  3. Educational Significance. The panels will use their expertise in the area to determine the extent to which the program:
    1. addresses an important education issue, challenge or problem
    2. has advantages over other programs with similar purposes
  4. Usefulness to Others. The panels will make these judgments by using their knowledge of what is valued by educator and student users in determining the extent to which the program:
    1. is reasonable in terms of costs to potential users in relation to expected benefits.
    2. is or can be made easily available to potential users
    3. can be readily adopted or easily adapted in new locations
    4. can be used in conjunction with other programs if appropriate