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The 1999 Agenda and Personnel Directory
for the National Center for Research in Vocational Education

MDS-1276






Graduate School of Education
University of California, Berkeley

Consortium Members

The University of California, Berkeley
The University of Illinois
The University of Minnesota
MPR Associates, Inc.
RAND
Teachers College, Columbia University
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
The University of Wisconsin

National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Graduate School of Education
University of California at Berkeley
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674


Supported by
The Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education

April 1999


FUNDING INFORMATION

Project Title: National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Grant Number: V051A30003-99/V051A30004-99
Act under which Funds Administered: Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act
P.L. 98-524
Source of Grant: Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education
Washington, DC 20202
Grantee: The Regents of the University of California
c/o National Center for Research in Vocational Education
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720
Director: David Stern
Percent of Total Grant Financed by Federal Money: 100%
Dollar Amount of Federal Funds for Grant: $4,500,000
Disclaimer: This publication was prepared pursuant to a grant with the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education. Grantees undertaking such projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their judgement in professional and technical matters. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official U.S. Department of Education position or policy.
Discrimination: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Therefore, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education project, like every program or activity receiving financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education, must be operated in compliance with these laws.



Section One:
1999 NCRVE Agenda



Mission Statement

The mission of the National Center for Research in Vocational Education (NCRVE) is to strengthen education to prepare all individuals for lasting and rewarding employment and lifelong learning.

NCRVE is the nation's largest center for research, development, dissemination, and outreach in work-related education. Headquartered at the University of California, Berkeley, since 1988, NCRVE is presently an eight-member consortium, with Berkeley assisted in its efforts by the University of Illinois; the University of Minnesota; MPR Associates; RAND; Teachers College, Columbia University; Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; and University of Wisconsin. The presence of NCRVE or one of its members in nearly every region of the country puts it in contact with the enormous diversity of educational institutions and labor markets in the United States. It also connects NCRVE with practitioners in each geographic region of the country.

NCRVE plays a key role in developing and disseminating a new concept of vocational education as it works towards fulfilling its mission to strengthen education to prepare all individuals for lasting and rewarding employment and lifelong learning. NCRVE believes such education

Finding innovative ways to connect education and work is central to the NCRVE's mission. Education must prepare youth for a world where learning and work are increasingly intertwined. NCRVE is committed to offering all students opportunities for challenging, relevant academics and meaningful work-based learning experiences in their communities. Through research and direct assistance to schools, we promote education that prepares students for college, careers, and lifelong learning. We find out what works and why.



Overview: 1999 Program of Work

Section One: NCRVE Agenda

How can vocational education best prepare students in high schools and community colleges both for further education and for productive careers? The NCRVE work plan for 1999 continues to address this question. It approaches the question through three new sets of activities:

  1. Mission, Standards, and Accountability for Vocational Education

  2. Teaching and Learning in Vocational Education

  3. Dissemination and Training

Section Two: NCRVE Personnel Directory

The directory to NCRVE staff appears as Section Two of this publication and is designed to facilitate access to administrative and project staff. The directory contains three subsections: headquarters personnel, site personnel, and project personnel. This last section is organized numerically by project.

[The 1999 Agenda and Personnel Directory for the National Center for Research in Vocational Education (MDS-1276) is available online at The NCRVE Web Site: <http://ncrve.berkeley.edu/MDS-1276/>.]



Research and Development Activities

Activity Set:
Mission, Standards, and Accountability for Vocational Education

Project 99-01
Returns to Emerging Educational Pathways
in a Changed Economy

Project Directors: Annette Bernhardt and Marc Scott, Teachers College, Columbia University (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: public policy, postsecondary education, school to work transition, subbaccalaureate labor market, returns to education, secondary-postsecondary-work transitions

Our project asks whether we can learn more about what might help to improve the wages and mobility of workers, especially for those who do not attain a bachelor's degree. This project will be a continuation of work that we started in 1998, where we focused on the differential effects on long-term wage growth of the timing and sequencing of education and how that education was combined with work. In 1999, we will augment the paths describing the process of moving from school to work with data on the type of high school education and the field of study information, as well as industry and occupation. This will allow us to better understand the mechanisms driving the dramatic shift in the returns to different levels of education, as well as the greater variability in wage outcomes that is evident across all education groups in the recent cohort of young workers. We will specifically test for combinations of occupational education and work experience that yield strong wage gains and more stable employment. Our approach will pinpoint the value of high school occupation-oriented, community college, and four-year college education by examining the context in which these are attained -- for example, decisions about the timing of education and working while in school.

At the end of the grant period, the principal investigators will submit a final report to NCRVE that documents the substantive findings. This will include descriptive statistics on the emerging trends and their impact on wage growth and job stability. We will discuss these in the context of larger issues surrounding education policy, summarizing how different combinations of education, work experience, and field of study can lead to stronger career opportunities for young people.

Project 99-02
Changing Admission Procedures in Four-Year Colleges
to Support K-12 Reform

Project Directors: L.Allen Phelps, University of Wisconsin - Madison
David Stern, University of California, Berkeley (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: performance-based college admissions and placement, public policy, K-12 reform

K-12 educational institutions have been responding to the perceived requirements of the information society by offering students more opportunities for applied learning and designing courses of study that prepare for both work and further education. Admission procedures in four-year colleges and universities, however, have constrained these reform efforts by continuing to emphasize grades in prescribed courses. The efficiency and accuracy of these traditional admission procedures are open to question, given the high dropout rates in four-year institutions, and the large proportion of students who are required to take remedial courses in college.

A few states have begun to develop admission standards based on more direct assessments of what students know and can do. Generalizing this approach nationwide could serve the interests of students, K-12 institutions, and four-year colleges alike.

In 1999, NCRVE will extend its research and dissemination efforts focused on advancing the discussion of new admission policies and procedures by

NCRVE will publish two reports. First, numerous high schools and two-year colleges are developing or offering career-related courses of instruction that are also intended to prepare students for four-year colleges or universities. Teachers, counselors, administrators, parents, and students in these high schools and two-year colleges will be interested in knowing to what extent new admission procedures in four-year colleges are providing better access for graduates of these new vocational and career-related programs. For this audience, we will prepare a brief, nontechnical summary of our findings, suitable for publication in a journal such as Techniques, Educational Leadership or Phi Delta Kappan . College admission counselors would also be interested in this publication. The second publication will be targeted at policymakers, analysts, and researchers in colleges and universities, in organizations concerned with higher education, and in relevant state and federal agencies. For this group, we will prepare a technical report that contains the results of our quantitative and qualitative analysis, as well as an executive summary for high-level policymakers.

Project 99-03
Enabling High Schools to Assess
Schoolwide Results of Reform

Project Director: Karen Levesque, MPR Associates (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: whole-school reform, secondary-postsecondary-work transitions, local data collection methods

This project will continue work begun in 1998 to assess schoolwide change and empower schools to use that information for continuous improvement. Beginning in 1999, an intensive program of technical assistance and qualitative data gathering will occur at ten High Schools That Work (HSTW) sites to assist these schools in interpreting and using schoolwide assessment data and to better understand how data analysis fits into their reform efforts. In addition, the 1999 project will continue its 1998 work with four Bay Area School Reform Collaborative (BASRC) high schools, will add two schools from the NCRVE project on New Designs for the Comprehensive High School (NDCHS), and will conduct a meeting for representatives from these three school networks.

In addition to immediate and lasting benefits for the schools involved, the project will produce a report that will guide other groups of schools in using whole-school data for school improvement. This publication will describe what was done and what was learned.

Project 99-04
Increasing the Contribution of Vocational Education
to Student Achievement: Support to States

Project Director: Phyllis Hudecki, University of California, Berkeley (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: technical assistance, state support, student achievement, assessment, accountability, team building

This project will build on NCRVE's effort during 1998 to provide technical support to states designed to strengthen the contribution of vocational education to student achievement.

A key development affecting the focus of the 1999 state agenda is the passage of the 1998 Carl Perkins Act (Perkins III) and its emphasis on accountability. A great deal hinges on states successfully implementing these accountability requirements. Congress has clearly indicated its willingness to grant states considerably more flexibility in the distribution and use of federal funds in exchange for demonstrating performance on such key outcomes related to student achievement. Indeed, states' performance on these indicators will, in all likelihood, significantly affect future levels of federal funding for vocational education.

Consequently, this initiative has the following objectives:

Activity Set:
Teaching and Learning in Vocational Education

Project 99-07
Who Participates in New Vocational Programs?

Project Directors: Mario Delci and David Stern, University of California, Berkeley
(Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: school reform, work-based learning, curricular integration, student participation, longitudinal data

For the past ten years, NCRVE has been engaged in the study and evaluation of practices designed to blend academic and vocational curriculum with work-based learning. Until recently, there has been no nationwide data on the prevalence of these reforms. The 1997 National Longitudinal Study of Youth (NLSY97) has now collected this data. This project will analyze the NLSY97 youth survey data to determine how many and what kinds of students are participating in new vocational and school-to-work programs. Of particular interest is the question of whether these new offerings are attracting different kinds of students than those who participate in traditional vocational education. The project will also compare these findings with results from earlier longitudinal studies, including the National Educational Longitudinal Survey 1988, the High School and Beyond Survey, and the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1972.

Numerous local communities, many states, and the federal government have invested considerable time and money in trying to create new curricular options in high schools in the 1990s. They will presumably be interested in knowing how many and what kinds of students are taking advantage of these new options. We will produce a technical report that will contain the results of the analysis of the NLSY97 student survey and a comparison of the results with findings from earlier studies. The report will place the analysis in the context of past and current research and policy in this area.

Project 99-08
Redesigning Education of Instructional Staff
for High Schools and Community Colleges

Project Directors: George Copa, University of Minnesota and Oregon State University
Curtis Finch, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Jane Plihal, University of Minnesota (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: teacher education, professional development-community college, professional development-secondary, school reform

Institutions that educate teachers and other instructional staff are faced with new demands for people who are equipped to work in high school and community colleges that are integrating academic and vocational curricula, using work-based learning as part of the instructional program, and articulating secondary and postsecondary studies. To ensure the readiness of staff (i.e., teachers, counselors, administrators, mentors), institutions that provide preservice education must reshape their programs based on a guiding conceptual framework.

One part of the project will focus on continuing the development of the redesign of preservice teacher education programs for high school teachers at two of the NCRVE consortium universities--University of California, Berkeley, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. In addition, the redesign of teacher education programs for community college instructors will be initiated at the University of Illinois--Champaign-Urbana. During 1999, attention will focus on implementation of redesign efforts, describing processes and results, and synthesizing lessons learned for other sites to use as they plan the redesign of teacher education.

The second part of the project will develop a conceptual framework for the redesign of preservice education for high school teachers and community colleges instructors. The framework will integrate academic and vocational curriculum, incorporate work-based learning, and articulate secondary and postsecondary learning experiences. This conceptual work will be grounded in part on the results of two previous NCRVE redesign projects: New Designs for the Comprehensive High School and New Designs for the Two-Year Institution of Higher Education .

Both the redesign of preservice teacher education efforts in NCRVE institutions and the development of a conceptual framework will draw on results of the contextual teaching and learning initiative of the U.S. Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), which is currently in progress.

The two parts of the project will be used to inform each other to their mutual benefit. Part one is grounded in the context and realities of present staff development structures, organization, processes, and policies. Part two provides insights and lessons from new and significantly advanced designs for the operation of high schools and community colleges. Part two is grounded in the future--on the staffing and staff development needs that occur when schools break ranks with the traditional ways of operating high schools and community colleges. The two parts of the project together provide a sense of vision, present reality, and ways to confront and reduce the creative tension between the two as it relates to preparation of instructional staff.

A report at the end of 1999 will consist of two main sections. The first will contain the new conceptual framework. Recommendations will address learning outcomes/expectations, learning process and organization, and needed partnerships. The second section will describe progress toward new designs for preservice teacher education at each of the participating NCRVE institutions.

Anticipated audiences for the product include university administrators, education faculty members, and leaders of teacher associations, including the subject-matter associations. The audience will also include those responsible for hiring and supervising the staff of K-12 schools and technical and community colleges, and the organizations and agencies involved in initial and continuing staff development.

Project 99-09
Who's Teaching, and Who Will Teach,
Vocational Education?

Project Director: Dominic Brewer, RAND (Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: teacher supply and demand, statistical profiles

This project will use multiple data sources to present a statistical profile of America's secondary vocational teachers, including an assessment of current demand and supply conditions in the labor market. On the demand side, enrollment trends and course taking patterns will be reviewed and new evidence on teacher retirements and quit patterns will be derived from state- and national-based data sources. Vocational teachers in different disciplines will be compared to each other and to academic teachers. On the supply side, the available supply of new teachers and re-entering teachers will be assessed from a review of secondary sources. The implications of any imbalance between demand and supply will also be analyzed, with an emphasis on the range of policy options that might help alleviate any shortage. This project will lay the groundwork for future database development on the vocational teacher labor market.

The project will result in a final technical report, to be reviewed and published by NCRVE. This report will contain the findings from all project tasks, detailed tabulations of results, and a description of the statistical and other methods used. It will present an overview of who is currently teaching vocational education in public secondary schools, an assessment of the components of future demand and supply, and an analysis of issues and concerns for practitioners and policymakers.

A work-in-progress briefing will be given at the national meeting of state directors of vocational education held in the spring in Washington, DC. A final briefing of the results will also be given at the ACTE (formerly known as American Vocational Association) annual conference in December 1999, should funding be available.

It is also anticipated that several academic and nontechnical journal articles, in such outlets as Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis and Phi Delta Kappan would be pursued based on results from the project .

Project 99-11
The Community College and Beyond:
How Tech Prep/School-to-Work Affects Students

Project Directors: Debra Bragg, University of Illinois--Urbana-Champaign
Carolyn Dornsife, University of California, Berkeley
(Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: school to work; Tech Prep, secondary-postsecondary-work transitions, case studies

Furthering research that was begun in 1998, the fundamental purpose of this study is to enrich and deepen our understanding of student outcomes associated with local Tech Prep/School-to-Work Opportunities Act (STWOA) implementation. The research design involves cross-comparative case studies in six sites located in Florida, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Oregon, and Texas. Within each selected site, a cohort of approximately 300 Tech Prep/STWOA participants is randomly selected, along with a comparison group of 300 nonparticipants. Educational and economic outcomes are documented and analyzed utilizing a follow-up survey, student transcripts, and other data available from local databases and sources. Focus groups and in-depth student interviews are planned for a small subset of Tech Prep participants. Findings are analyzed on a site-by-site basis as well as across sites. Results will be used to inform policy and practice directed at improving the linkages between secondary and postsecondary education and work, particularly in local Tech Prep/STWOA systems.

At the conclusion of the study, two reports will be generated: a technical report and a policy paper. The technical report will summarize major findings, conclusions, and recommendations concerning Tech Prep/STWOA implementation on a site-by-site basis as well as across all sites. The policy paper will address key policy questions and make specific recommendations for policymakers at all levels.

Together, these two documents will provide educators, administrators, and policymakers with information that has immediate application to local Tech Prep/STWOA systems. Lessons learned for state and federal policy formulation and implementation will also be reported.

Project 99-12
Professional Development in Academic-Occupational
Integration for Community College Instructors

Project Directors: Dolores Perin and Thomas Bailey, Teachers College, Columbia University (Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: curricular integration, postsecondary education, professional development-postsecondary, professional development-materials

This project will contribute to improving the quality of education in community colleges by producing a pre-field tested version of a professional development manual for training in academic-occupational integration. Preparation of materials will be based on in-depth case studies at sites where high-quality implementations of academic-occupational integration are in progress. These professional development materials are designed for application in occupational education and Tech Prep programs that are developed using paired-course and learning community models. This work builds on previous NCRVE projects.

The manual will contain modules for thirty hours of staff development, and will include background on academic-occupational integration, student learning outcomes, collaborative exercises, and samples of syllabi and lesson plans. The staff training activities emphasize a participatory approach based on teacher inquiry, using reflective journals, peer interviews, and classroom observations.

Previous studies of integrated instruction have shown that while professors and administrators at many community colleges support integrated instruction, fewer have actually implemented sophisticated models of this type of instruction. One problem is that these instructors often have little opportunity to learn how to use integrated pedagogy. The manual will help meet this underlying need.

Moreover, integrated instruction is a core part of the Tech Prep model. Better professional development and associated materials relevant to integrated instruction may also help strengthen the community college role in Tech Prep.

The project also will provide ongoing support to two concurrent NCRVE projects: Project 99-11 ( Community College and Beyond: How Tech Prep/School-to-Work Affects Students ) and Project 99-15 ( The Community College Cooperative ).

The professional development manual will prepare community college occupational and Tech-Prep faculty to integrate occupational and academic instruction. The target audience for the manual includes professional development leaders, and faculty and program chairs in community college occupational and general education departments. These audiences include participants in The Community College Cooperative (Project 99-15) outreach workshops held in 1999.

Project 99-13
Field-Initiated Activities

Program Director: David Stern, University of California, Berkeley (Year 2 of 2)
Keyword: field-initiated proposals

The Perkins Act authorizes NCRVE to set aside up to 10% of its grant for field-initiated activities that are consistent with NCRVE's mission but not included in the plan of work. Accordingly, NCRVE accepts proposals from the field for small projects or activities to be conducted either by NCRVE or by the applicant. Eligible applicants include public agencies, policymakers, administrators, practitioners, students, citizens, or organizations representing such groups. An application or request may be made to the NCRVE Director, or to one of the NCRVE sites, which then transmits it to the NCRVE Director.

The NCRVE Director judges applications or requests according to the following criteria:

The NCRVE Director informs the OVAE Program Officer before committing resources for field-initiated activities.

For abstracts of the 1999 Field-Initiated Activities, readers are encouraged to visit the online version of this publication at <http://ncrve.berkeley.edu/MDS-1276/MDS-1276.html#99-13>.



Ongoing Research and Development Activities

The following activities are continuing in 1999 without 1999 funding allocations.

Contextualized Learning of Academic
Subject Matter: State of the Art
(Field-Initiated Activity)

Project Directors: Lauren Resnick and Mark Jury, University of Pittsburgh
Keywords: contextualized learning, situated cognition

At the heart of the current interest in school-to-career education is a broadly held belief that there is a special value in learning that is contextualized, situated, or experiential. This belief seems to derive from several separate lines of thinking. There is the practical view that students in school need experience with some of the complex, multi-demand kinds of tasks that they will face in high-performance work organizations. This view is often joined by the observation that for many students, motivation for learning seems to be greatly enhanced by participation in practical, real-world forms of learning. Finally, these practically grounded views are convergent with the concept of situated cognition that argues learning is best understood as acquiring the capacities required to act in specific situations and that calls into question the very existence of generic skills.

Despite the excitement about these new forms of teaching and learning, there is, in fact, little systematic evidence about their effectiveness--especially with respect to meeting academic standards in math, science, and English/communications.

This project seeks to assemble and evaluate the evidence. The research includes five components: (1) identification of programs; (2) selection of programs for detailed analysis; (3) analysis of exemplary programs and creation of an analytic database; (4) field observation of implementation of selected programs and creation of an implementation database; and (5) preparation of a monograph based on the analysis of programs, which will include an assessment of the potential for this approach in school to career programs described above.

Project 98-04
Developing Employment-Related Technology Skills

Project Director: Judith J. Lambrecht, University of Minnesota (Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: school-based learning, work-based learning, information technology, business education, skills development

Students need to learn how to use technology effectively by understanding the following:

The intent of this project is to examine the perspectives of teachers, students, and employer/supervisors of internship or cooperative education programs about how these three dimensions of effective technology use are balanced through in-school instruction and related internship or cooperative education placements. The understanding gained will provide guidance for programs faced with preparing students who can transfer in-school preparation to unpredictable, constantly changing, job requirements in the field of information technology use in business settings.

The project will produce the following materials:



Dissemination and Training Activities

Activity Set:
Dissemination and Training

Project 99-14
The Dissemination Program

Project Director: Peter Seidman, University of California, Berkeley (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: referral/information brokering, social marketing/public information, information dissemination, electronic communications/resources

The objective of the core Dissemination Program is to maximize the visibility and usefulness of NCRVE-generated knowledge to NCRVE's constituents (policymakers, practitioners, and researchers), producing high-quality print and electronic publications.

The Dissemination Program operates as the centrally coordinated system among NCRVE staff, and research and non-research stakeholders in the vocational education enterprise. The Dissemination Program is an integral part of NCRVE's infrastructure, offering a consistent, reliable method of translating, brokering, and distributing NCRVE-generated research, development, and service-based knowledge; practitioner-based knowledge; and policy-based knowledge in ways useful to our constituencies and usable by them.

The Dissemination Program accomplishes these tasks through using a varying blend of several approaches. Included among these methods are database development and use, information brokering, publications, marketing/promotion, direct interpersonal linkages, and electronic communications.

The Dissemination Program will produce and distribute the following public-domain materials:

The Dissemination Program will maintain a display booth at approximately twelve professional conferences and meetings in order to make attendees aware of NCRVE resources. The Dissemination Program anticipates booths at conferences such as the following: the American Association of Community Colleges, the American Educational Research Association, the Association for Career and Technical Education, Work Now and In the Future 16, and Workforce 2000/League for Innovation in the Community College.

Project 99-15
The Community College Cooperative

Project Director: W. Norton Grubb, University of California, Berkeley (Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: collegial communities, professional development-postsecondary, curricular integration, Tech Prep, work-based learning

The Community College Cooperative (CCC or C 3) is a network to provide technical assistance to community colleges about curriculum integration, Tech Prep, and work-based learning. It rests on three elements: (1) the use of expert peers -- practitioners in community colleges -- as well as staff to provide assistance to novice peers; (2) the development of technical assistance that is continuous rather than "one-shot", and that incorporates the appropriate range of faculty, administrators, and institutional researchers, rather than focusing on one group or another; and (3) the provision of technical assistance to organizations and forums -- like administrators, groups that determine the transferability of courses, and state credentialing offices -- in ways that will facilitate the work of the CCC.

Starting in the fall of 1999, an initial round of workshops will be presented. There will be a network of CCC staff, experts, and participants. This group will be tied together through electronic means, a newsletter, and perhaps other conferences. Thus, the results by the end of 1999 will include both tangible results -- a roster of experts, materials used in conferences -- and intangible outcomes embodied in the connections among the CCC participants. This organizational capacity will then continue to generate technical assistance in the future. By the end of 1999, the CCC will be institutionalized to the extent that it can continue to provide a variety of services.

CCC will draw together the resources of not only faculty and staff at the University of California, Berkeley site, but also those site staff at NCRVE's Teachers College and University of Illinois sites who are working on community colleges issues. CCC will also establish partnerships with the U.S. Office of the Liaison for Community Colleges, the AACC and its affiliates NCOE and NETWORK, the League for Innovation, and other community college groups.

The "deliverables" or products of the CCC by the end of 1999 will include the following:

Conference presentations at national organizations like the AACC, NCOE, NETWORK, and regional counterparts are anticipated.

Project 99-16
Improving Career Guidance Programs Through
Professional Development

Project Director: Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein, University of Illinois (Year 1 of 1)
Keywords: professional development-career guidance and counseling, program replication

As more and more schools adopt new delivery systems in the context of work and careers, the need to assist students in their career development becomes even more critical. Yet, the national response to this need has been minimal. One exception has been the efforts of NCRVE and the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE) to identify and disseminate information about exemplary programs.

For the past four years, NCRVE, OVAE, and participating organizations have conducted a search for exemplary career guidance and counseling programs. In addition to identifying and recognizing the programs, NCRVE has disseminated information about exemplary programs through the development of monographs, journal and newsletter articles, and presentations at national conferences. To have a deeper impact on the development of comprehensive career development programs, NCRVE proposes to greatly expand the professional development effort in 1999 by developing workshops for teams of counselors, teachers, and other school personnel.

Major activities are proposed:

  1. The development and implementation of a series of professional development programs targeting school counselors, administrators, and other educators to provide instruction in how to replicate exemplary practices. The project staff will work with the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the Guidance Division of the ACTE ( formerly known as American Vocational Association) (ACTE-GD), the State Supervisors of Guidance and Counseling (NASSGS), and the University of Wisconsin's Center on Education and Work (UW-CEW) in planning and implementing this activity.

  2. The production of a handbook on best practices addressing the benefits from comprehensive programs, how others can replicate these programs, and contact information for additional assistance and resources. Intended users are educators, administrators, counselors, and policymakers interested in career development that facilitates the transition of students from school to work. Additional users may include state education systems and school districts which can utilize the handbook for their inservice activities.

The handbook will be disseminated through the NCRVE. Information about the handbook will be included in web sites and appropriate professional publications. A draft of the handbook will be field-tested during the ASCA Pre-Conference and then used in the succeeding workshops.

An advisory committee will be convened to direct and guide the development and implementation of the professional development workshops and the handbook.

Project 99-17
Technical Assistance to High Schools That Work
and the Southern Regional Education Board

Project Director: Denise Bradby, MPR Associates (Year 2 of 2)
Keywords: technical assistance: curriculum/program improvement, K-12 reform, academic skills

The Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) has depended upon NCRVE to be its research partner in the High Schools That Work (HSTW) initiative since the project's inception in 1988. Significantly, the HSTW network is looked upon as one of only a few reform networks consistently using data to provide evidence of its success and challenges.

The year of 1999 brings with it the capacity to capitalize on the data collection efforts of SREB and its member sites in the HSTW effort as never before. With the coming availability of the 1998 assessment and survey data and the number of sites that have been participating for six years, researchers have the opportunity to not only dig for evidence of success and remaining challenges, but also to parse the data into subgroups that may offer additional lessons for others.

NCRVE's scope of work includes subgroup and consortium-wide data analysis, continued presentations and workshops that make connections between research and practice (e.g., at the Consortium Board meetings as well as the SREB Summer Staff Conference), and an increased focus on connecting HSTW and other NCRVE projects, especially 99-03, Enabling High Schools To Assess Schoolwide Results of Reform , and 99-04, Increasing the Contribution of Vocational Education to Student Achievement: Support to States .

The results of the Consortium-wide (full program) analysis will be presented in a readable, user-friendly summary report. SREB and NCRVE both will receive the consortium analysis to distribute to their membership as the different boards and members deem appropriate. The subgroup-specific analysis and the reports that come about as a result of those analyses will be distributed primarily to SREB participants.

NCRVE's work with HSTW--especially its presence at the summer staff conference and at workshop events--is one of NCRVE's primary vehicles for highly visible activities that reach thousands of practitioners at several levels (school building, district, and state) and from many arenas (e.g., academic as well as vocational educators; middle school and junior high school as well as secondary staff). Maintaining this presence and conducting useful, informative workshops is an important facet of NCRVE's overall dissemination plan.



Index

academic skills 99-17

accountability 99-04

assessment 99-04

business education 98-04

case studies 99-11

collegial communities 99-15

contextualized learning Field-Initiated Activity

curricular integration 99-07, 99-12, 99-15

electronic communications/resources 99-14

field-initiated proposals 99-13

information dissemination 99-14

information technology 98-04

K-12 reform 99-02, 99-17

local data collection methods 99-03

longitudinal data 99-07

performance-based college admissions and placement 99-02

postsecondary education 99-01, 99-12

professional development-career guidance and counseling 99-16

professional development-community college 99-08

professional development-materials 99-12

professional development-postsecondary 99-12, 99-15

professional development-secondary 99-08

program replication 99-16

public policy 99-01, 99-02

referral/information brokering 99-14

returns to education 99-01

school reform 99-07, 99-08

school to work 99-11

school to work transition 99-01

school-based learning 98-04

secondary-postsecondary-work transitions 99-01, 99-03, 99-11

situated cognition Field-Initiated Activity

skills development 98-04

social marketing/public information 99-14

state support 99-04

statistical profiles 99-09

student achievement 99-04

student participation 99-07

subbaccalaureate labor market 99-01

teacher education 99-08

teacher supply and demand 99-09

team building 99-04

Tech Prep 99-11, 99-15

technical assistance 99-04

technical assistance: curriculum/program improvement 99-17

whole-school reform 99-03

work-based learning 99-07, 98-04, 99-15


Section Two:
NCRVE Personnel Directory

Headquarters Personnel

National Center for Research in Vocational Education

University of California, Berkeley
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
(800) (old phone deleted)
FAX: (510) 642-2124

Director
David Stern
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Associate Director
Phyllis Hudecki
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Deputy Director
Olivia Armstrong
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124

Administrative

Ken Bowers, Assistant to NCRVE Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-7035
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Peggy Drake, Financial Assistant III
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-3797
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Alana Halbritter, Financial Assistant II
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-2048
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Jeanette Luong
Receptionist/Personnel/Payroll Assistant I
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-8892
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Diana Nielsen, Personnel/Payroll Assistant III
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-2035
FAX: (510) 642-2124

Site Personnel

University of California, Berkeley

Site Director
W. Norton Grubb
University of California, Berkeley
Graduate School of Education
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-3488
FAX: (510) 642-4803

University of Illinois-Champaign/Urbana

Site Director
Debra Bragg
University of Illinois
Department of Human Resource Education
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Administrative
Linda Iliff, Administrative Assistant
University of Illinois
Department of Human Resource Education
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632

University of Minnesota

Site Director
Judith J. Lambrecht
Department of Work, Community, and Family Education
University of Minnesota
420A VoTech Building
1954 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 626-1256
FAX: (612) 624-4720
Administrative
Sandi Emmerson, Principal Secretary
Department of Work, Community, and Family Education
University of Minnesota
425P VoTech Building
1954 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 624-7240
FAX: (612) 624-4720

MPR Associates, Inc.

Site Director
Gary Hoachlander
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794
Administrative
Kathleen Mullen, Administrative Assistant
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794

RAND

Site Director
Cathy Stasz
RAND
1700 Main Street
P.O. Box 2138
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
(310) 393-0411, ext. 6326
FAX: (310) 393-4818
Administrative
Donna White, Administrative Assistant
RAND
1700 Main Street
P.O. Box 2138
Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138
(310) 393-0411, ext. 7462
FAX: (310) 393-4818

Teachers College, Columbia University

Site Director
Thomas Bailey
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3091
FAX: (212) 678-3699
Administrative
Kathleen Keane, Administrative Assistant
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3091
FAX: (212) 678-3699

Lisa Rothman, Assistant Director
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3331
FAX: (212) 678-3699

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Site Director
Curtis Finch
Vocational and Technical Education
115 Lane Hall
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0254
(540) 231-8175
FAX: (540) 231-2747
Administrative
Paul Dettmann, Fiscal/Business/Personnel
Vocational and Technical Education
112 Lane Hall
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and
State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0254
(540) 231-5982
FAX: (540) 231-2747

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Site Director
L. Allen Phelps
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center on Education and Work
964 Educational Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
(608) 263-2714
FAX: (608) 262-3063
Administrative
Joyce Shepard, Support Staff
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center on Education and Work
964 Educational Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
(608) 265-6700
FAX: (608) 262-3063

Project Personnel

Research and Development Activities

(Project 99-01) Returns to Emerging Educational Pathways in a Changed Economy

Annette Bernhardt, Project Director
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3091
FAX: (212) 678-3699
Marc Scott, Project Director
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3091
FAX: (212) 678-3699

(Project 99-02) Changing Admission Procedures in Four-Year Colleges to Support K-12 Reform

L. Allen Phelps, Project Director
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center on Education and Work
964 Educational Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
(608) 263-2714
FAX: (608) 262-3063
David Stern, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Derek Briggs, Graduate Student Researcher
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Jason Ebbeling, Research Assistant
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center on Education and Work
964 Educational Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
(608) 265-4179
FAX: (608) 262-3063
Christine Maidl-Pribbenow, Research Assistant
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Center on Education and Work
964 Educational Sciences
1025 W. Johnson Street
Madison, WI 53706-1796
(608) 265-4179
FAX: (608) 262-3063

(Project 99-03) Enabling High Schools to Assess Schoolwide Results of Reform

Karen Levesque, Project Director
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794
George Copa
Oregon State University
School of Education
Educ 420 OSU
Corvallis, OR 97331-4501
(541) 737-8201
FAX: (541) 737-2040
Doug Lauen
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794
Terry Ross, Controller
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794

(Project 99-04) Increasing the Contribution of Vocational Education to Student Achievement: Support to States

Phyllis Hudecki, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Michael Butler
Public Works, Inc.
90 N. Daisy Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91107
(626) 564-9890
FAX: (626) 564-0657
Kerri Limbrecht
Public Works, Inc.
90 N. Daisy Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91107
(626) 564-9890
FAX: (626) 564-0657
Patricia O'Driscoll
Public Works, Inc.
90 N. Daisy Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91107
(626) 564-9890
FAX: (626) 564-0657
Mikala Rahn
Public Works, Inc.
90 N. Daisy Avenue
Pasadena, CA 91107
(626) 564-9890
FAX: (626) 564-0657
Jane Sanborn
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794
Peter Teitelbaum
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794

(Project 99-07) Who Participates in New Vocational Programs?

Mario Delci, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-6441
FAX: (510) 642-2124
David Stern, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124

(Project 99-08) Redesigning Education of Instructional Staff for High Schools and Community Colleges

George Copa, Project Director
Oregon State University
School of Education
Educ 420 OSU
Corvallis, OR 97331-4501
(541) 737-8201
FAX: (541) 737-2040
Curtis Finch, Project Director
Vocational and Technical Education
115 Lane Hall
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0254
(540) 231-8175
FAX: (540) 231-2747
Jane Plihal, Project Director
Department of Work, Community, and Family Education
University of Minnesota
210 VoTech Building
1954 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 624-3069
FAX: (612) 624-2231

Participating NCRVE Sites

Steve Aragon
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Jerilyn Harris
University of California, Berkeley
Graduate School of Education
4313 Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-7977
FAX: (510) 643-8904
Betty Heath-Camp
Vocational and Technical Education
201 Wallace Hall
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0467
(540) 231-8189
FAX: (540) 231-2747
Patricia Kelly
Center for Teacher Education
225 War Memorial Hall
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg, VA 24061-0313
(540) 231-5174
FAX: (540) 231-9075
Dan Zimmerlin
University of California, Berkeley
Graduate School of Education
4651 Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-0748
FAX: (510) 642-3769

(Project 99-09) Who's Teaching, and Who Will Teach, Vocational Education?

Dominic Brewer, Project Director
RAND
1333 H Street, NW
Washington, DC 20005-4707
(202) 296-5000, ext. 5284
FAX: (202) 296-7960

(Project 99-11) The Community College and Beyond: How Tech Prep/School-to-Work Affects Students

Debra Bragg, Project Director
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Carolyn Dornsife, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-5206
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Donna Dare, Visiting Specialist
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Megan Kirby, Clerical Assistant
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Jim Layton, Visiting Assistant Professor
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Ghazala Ovaice, Graduate Research Assistant
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
William Reger, Post-Doc. Research Specialist
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632

(Project 99-12) Professional Development in Academic-Occupational Integration for Community College Instructors

Thomas Bailey, Project Director
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3091
FAX: (212) 678-3699
Dolores Perin, Project Director
Institute on Education and the Economy
Teachers College, Columbia University
Box 174, 439 Thorndike Hall
525 W. 120th Street
New York, NY 10027
(212) 678-3943
FAX: (212) 678-3699

(Project 99-13) Field-Initiated Activities

David Stern, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Mark Jury, Research Associate
562 LRDC Building
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-6962
FAX: (412) 624-3051
Deborah McKoy, Research Associate
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-9020
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Lauren Resnick, Principal Investigator
824 LRDC Building
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-7485
FAX: (412) 624-3051

Ongoing Research and Development Activities

Contextualized Learning of Acadmic Subject Matter: State of the Art (Field-Initiated Activity)

Lauren Resnick, Principal Investigator
824 LRDC Building
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-7485
FAX: (412) 624-3051
Mark Jury, Research Associate
562 LRDC Building
University of Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
(412) 624-6962
FAX: (412) 624-3051

(Project 98-04) Developing Employment-Related Technology Skills

Judith J. Lambrecht, Project Director
Department of Work, Community, and Family Education
University of Minnesota
420A VoTech Building
1954 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 626-1256
FAX: (612) 624-4720
Sandi Emmerson, Principal Secretary
Department of Work, Community, and Family Education
University of Minnesota
425P VoTech Building
1954 Buford Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55108
(612) 624-7240
FAX: (612) 624-4720

Dissemination and Training Activities

(Project 99-14) The Dissemination Program

Peter Seidman, Project Director
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-4004
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Marilyn Abbink, Project Staff
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-6539
FAX: (510) 642-2124
David Carlson, Project Staff
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-3798
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Carrie Collins, Project Staff
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 643-5748
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Damaris Moore, Project Staff
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-7499
FAX: (510) 642-2124
Mary Carol Randall, Project Staff
NCRVE
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94720-1674
(510) 642-5564
FAX: (510) 642-2124

Materials Distribution Service (MDS)

F. Gene Miller, Director
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Phyllis Plank, Associate Director
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Diana Burnell, Customer Service Manager
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Tammy Carson, Document Design Specialist
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Gina Colley, Projects Accounts Specialist
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Christine Hulbert, Projects Assistant
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Sandra Larimer, Projects Editor
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Pam Mainland, Projects Printing Coordinator
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869
Sean O'Donnell-Brown, Projects Technology Coordinator
NCRVE Materials Distribution Service
Western Illinois University
1 University Circle
46 Horrabin Hall
Macomb, IL 61455
(800) 637-7652 or (309) 298-3382
FAX: (309) 298-2869

(Project 99-15) The Community College Cooperative

W. Norton Grubb, Project Director
University of California, Berkeley
Graduate School of Education
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 642-3488
FAX: (510) 642-4803
Norena Badway
University of California, Berkeley
Graduate School of Education
3606B Tolman Hall
Berkeley, CA 94720
(510) 643-7482
FAX: (510) 642-4803

(Project 99-16) Improving Career Guidance Programs Through Professional Development

Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein, Project Director
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632
Zipura Burac Matias
University of Illinois
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
FAX: (217) 244-5632

(Project 99-17) Technical Assistance To High Schools That Work and the Southern Regional Education Board

Denise Bradby, Project Director
MPR Associates, Inc.
2150 Shattuck Avenue, Suite 800
Berkeley, CA 94704
(510) 849-4942
FAX: (510) 849-0794

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