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A School-to-Work Resource Guide: Focusing on Diversity

MDS-747


Compiled by

Office of Special Populations

Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein
Zipura Burac Matias
Esmeralda S. Cunanan
Becky Taylor Krall
Linda Iliff


University of Illinois



National Center for Research in Vocational Education
University of California at Berkeley
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94704-1058


Supported by
The Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education

December, 1995

PLEASE NOTE: This is an electronic version of a printed directory that was correct at the time of printing, but no effort has been made to keep all contact information up-to-date. For the most current information, visit the NCRVE Office of Student Services' website at http://ncrve-oss.ed.uiuc.edu/

FUNDING INFORMATION

Project Title: National Center for Research in Vocational Education
Grant Number: V051A30003-95A/V051A30004-95A
Act under which Funds Administered: Carl D. Perkins Vocational Education Act
P.L. 98-524
Source of Grant: Office of Vocational and Adult Education
U.S. Department of Education
Washington, DC 20202
Grantee: The Regents of the University of California
c/o National Center for Research in Vocational Education
2030 Addison Street, Suite 500
Berkeley, CA 94704
Director: David Stern
Percent of Total Grant Financed by Federal Money: 100%
Dollar Amount of Federal Funds for Grant: $6,000,000
Disclaimer: This publication was prepared pursuant to a grant with the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education. Grantees undertaking such projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their judgement in professional and technical matters. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official U.S. Department of Education position or policy.
Discrimination: Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving federal financial assistance." Therefore, the National Center for Research in Vocational Education project, like every program or activity receiving financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Education, must be operated in compliance with these laws.



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This guide is designed for those educators who are developing or implementing a school-to-work program, as well as those educators who are interested in background information about school-to-work. The resources, which contain the most current information consist of publications; newsletters and journals; educational information centers, agencies, and organizations. Sections relating to the requirements of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 include School-Based Learning Component, Work-Based Learning Component, and Connecting Activities Component. The General Information on School-to-Work section includes reports, papers, and other publications that describe the status of school-to-work programs in the United States, the nature of workforce and job training programs, and the analyses and explanations of the School-to-Work legislation and its impact on current educational reform. Additional sections on Transition Issues for Special Populations and Gender Equity Issues are included.




PREFACE

On May 4, 1994, President Bill Clinton signed the School-to-Work Opportunities Act of 1994 (PL 103-239). The School-to-Work Opportunities (STWO) Act is designed to help states develop and implement a system that integrates school-based and work-based learning and provides high school students with a chance to complete a career major. Programs developed under the STWO Act must provide all students with equal access to the full range of program components and related activities such as recruitment, enrollment, and placement activities. All students is defined as "both male and female students from a broad range of backgrounds and circumstances, including disadvantaged students, students with diverse racial, ethnic, or cultural backgrounds, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, migrant children, school dropouts, and academically talented students" (Section 4).

The STWO Act has three major components: (1) school-based learning, (2) work-based learning, and (3) connecting activities. The school-based learning component requires career awareness, exploration, and counseling beginning no later than 7th grade, including options that may not be traditional for their gender, race, or ethnicity. It requires a program of instruction and curriculum that integrates academic and vocational learning, and incorporates instruction, to the extent practicable, in all aspects of an industry. Another requirement is regularly scheduled evaluations which must identify academic strengths and weaknesses, academic progress, workplace knowledge, goals, and the need for additional learning opportunities to master core academic and vocational skills.

The work-based learning component requires work experience (paid or unpaid), including such activities as job shadowing, school-sponsored enterprises, or on-the-job training. It also includes a planned program of job training and work experiences that are coordinated with learning in the school-based learning component. Other requirements include workplace mentoring; instruction in general workplace competencies, including instruction and activities related to developing positive work attitudes; and instruction in all aspects of the industry.

The connecting activities component includes (1) matching students with the work-based learning opportunities of employers, providing a school site mentor, and supplying technical assistance and services to employers in designing each of the three components, as well as the training of teachers and mentors; and (2) providing assistance in integrating school-based and work-based learning components, as well as academic and occupational learning, and encouraging participation of employers in local activities. Local partnerships are required to link participants with community services that may be necessary to assure a successful transition from school to work and to assist completers with job or education placement. Programs are also directed to collect and analyze information regarding post-program outcomes of participants. In order to determine how well different populations are faring, the STWO Act requires that this collection and analysis be on the basis of socioeconomic status, race, gender, ethnicity, culture, and disability. Data collection and analysis should also consider whether the participants are students with limited English proficiency, students at risk of dropping out, students who are disadvantaged, or students who are academically talented. Other local and state mandates address the need to give students flexibility to develop new career goals, to change career majors, and to transfer between education and training programs.

Measurable outcomes in both academic and vocational learning are emphasized at every level of planning. The school-based learning component must be designed to meet the same academic standards set by the state for all students, to prepare students for postsecondary education, and to award skills certificates. The vocational content of programs must be broad, providing students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of the industry students are preparing to enter (including planning, management, finances, technical and production skills, underlying principles of technology, labor and community issues, health and safety issues, and environmental issues).

This guide contains the most current resources (1990-present) for those who are developing or implementing a school-to-work program. The resources consist of publications; newsletters and journals; and educational information centers, agencies, and organizations. Sections relating to the requirements of the STWO Act include School-Based Learning Component, Work-Based Learning Component, and Connecting Activities Component. The General Information on School-to-Work section includes reports, papers, and other publications that describe the status of school-to-work programs in the United States, the nature of workforce and job training programs, and analyses and explanations of the School-to-Work legislation and its impact on current educational reform. Because transition requirements for most students with disabilities are somewhat different, we included an additional section on Transition Issues for Special Populations. Likewise, we included a separate section on resources dealing with gender equity issues. The final section includes a list of the curriculum coordination centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

This guide is not intended to be a comprehensive listing of all available resources. The resources included are the most current and are representative of the field. Whenever possible, an annotation, the price, ordering information, and address are provided for each entry. Resources should be ordered directly from the publisher listed in each annotation. For further information about any of the centers and organizations, contact the person or office listed opposite each entry.




THE OFFICE OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS

Mission

The Office of Special Populations works nationally to increase vocational program accessibility, quality, and availability for youth and adults from special populations. It is one of the five Dissemination and Training Programs in the National Center for Research in Vocational Education at the University of California at Berkeley.

Objectives

To increase awareness and understanding of critical issues in vocational special needs education:

To increase awareness and appreciation of the School-to-Work Opportunities Act's emphasis on ensuring the full participation of a diverse population of students in the full range of available school-to-work activities and opportunities.

To increase the use of available resources.

To initiate and support networks of professionals.

To promote exemplary program activity and the adoption of model practices.

To maximize the impact of the Office of Special Populations' resources and activities through collaborative activities with state and national organizations.

Staff

Dr. Carolyn Maddy-Bernstein, Director
E-Mail: maddy2@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Dr. Zipura Burac Matias, Associate Director
E-Mail: zburac@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Dr. Esmeralda S. Cunanan, Research Associate
E-Mail: cunanan@ux1.cso.uiuc.edu

Janet Kantenberger, Research Assistant
Linda Iliff, Administrative Assistant

Address

University of Illinois
Vocational and Technical Education
345 Education Building
1310 S. Sixth Street
Champaign, IL 61820
(217) 333-0807
Fax: (217) 244-5632

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